Limits...
Modelling vaccination schedules for a cancer immunoprevention vaccine.

Motta S, Castiglione F, Lollini P, Pappalardo F - Immunome Res (2005)

Bottom Line: This model accurately reproduces in-vivo experiments results on HER-2/neu mice treated with the immuno-prevention cancer vaccine (Triplex) for mammary carcinoma.In vivo experiments have shown the effectiveness of Triplex vaccine in protection of mice from mammary carcinoma.We found that, applying the vaccination scheme used in in-vivo experiments, the number of vaccine injections can be reduced roughly by 30%.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. motta@dmi.unict.it

ABSTRACT
We present a systematic approach to search for an effective vaccination schedule using mathematical computerized models. Our study is based on our previous model that simulates the cancer vs immune system competition activated by tumor vaccine. This model accurately reproduces in-vivo experiments results on HER-2/neu mice treated with the immuno-prevention cancer vaccine (Triplex) for mammary carcinoma. In vivo experiments have shown the effectiveness of Triplex vaccine in protection of mice from mammary carcinoma. The full protection was conferred using chronic (prophylactic) vaccination protocol while therapeutic vaccination was less efficient. In the present paper we use the computer simulations to systematically search for a vaccination schedule which prevents solid tumor formation. The strategy we used for defining a successful vaccination schedule is to control the number of cancer cells with vaccination cycles. We found that, applying the vaccination scheme used in in-vivo experiments, the number of vaccine injections can be reduced roughly by 30%.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immune response. The immune response activation due to the vaccine effect is shown for CHRONIC vaccination schedules, versus time in days. Red ticks above x axis represent the timing of vaccine administration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1287065&req=5

Figure 9: Immune response. The immune response activation due to the vaccine effect is shown for CHRONIC vaccination schedules, versus time in days. Red ticks above x axis represent the timing of vaccine administration.

Mentions: The general behavior of the most relevant quantities versus time has been already described in [16]. Here we take the matter again to analyze in detail the system reaction to vaccine injections in order to envisage a new vaccination protocol which prevents the solid tumor formation. To better appreciate this reaction with respect to vaccine injection timing we consider the plots of the relevant quantities separately for each schedule and we mark the vaccination times. As in [16] we consider, for the S1 statistical samples, the mean values, total number of immune cells and cancer cells in the lattice as function of time. These quantities are plotted in Figures 6, 7, 8, 9, respectively for Very Late, Early, Late and Chronic, for each schedule. Figure 5 show the same quantities for the untreated mice in S1.


Modelling vaccination schedules for a cancer immunoprevention vaccine.

Motta S, Castiglione F, Lollini P, Pappalardo F - Immunome Res (2005)

Immune response. The immune response activation due to the vaccine effect is shown for CHRONIC vaccination schedules, versus time in days. Red ticks above x axis represent the timing of vaccine administration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1287065&req=5

Figure 9: Immune response. The immune response activation due to the vaccine effect is shown for CHRONIC vaccination schedules, versus time in days. Red ticks above x axis represent the timing of vaccine administration.
Mentions: The general behavior of the most relevant quantities versus time has been already described in [16]. Here we take the matter again to analyze in detail the system reaction to vaccine injections in order to envisage a new vaccination protocol which prevents the solid tumor formation. To better appreciate this reaction with respect to vaccine injection timing we consider the plots of the relevant quantities separately for each schedule and we mark the vaccination times. As in [16] we consider, for the S1 statistical samples, the mean values, total number of immune cells and cancer cells in the lattice as function of time. These quantities are plotted in Figures 6, 7, 8, 9, respectively for Very Late, Early, Late and Chronic, for each schedule. Figure 5 show the same quantities for the untreated mice in S1.

Bottom Line: This model accurately reproduces in-vivo experiments results on HER-2/neu mice treated with the immuno-prevention cancer vaccine (Triplex) for mammary carcinoma.In vivo experiments have shown the effectiveness of Triplex vaccine in protection of mice from mammary carcinoma.We found that, applying the vaccination scheme used in in-vivo experiments, the number of vaccine injections can be reduced roughly by 30%.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. motta@dmi.unict.it

ABSTRACT
We present a systematic approach to search for an effective vaccination schedule using mathematical computerized models. Our study is based on our previous model that simulates the cancer vs immune system competition activated by tumor vaccine. This model accurately reproduces in-vivo experiments results on HER-2/neu mice treated with the immuno-prevention cancer vaccine (Triplex) for mammary carcinoma. In vivo experiments have shown the effectiveness of Triplex vaccine in protection of mice from mammary carcinoma. The full protection was conferred using chronic (prophylactic) vaccination protocol while therapeutic vaccination was less efficient. In the present paper we use the computer simulations to systematically search for a vaccination schedule which prevents solid tumor formation. The strategy we used for defining a successful vaccination schedule is to control the number of cancer cells with vaccination cycles. We found that, applying the vaccination scheme used in in-vivo experiments, the number of vaccine injections can be reduced roughly by 30%.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus