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What can we hope to gain for trypanosomiasis control from molecular studies on tsetse biology ?

Aksoy S, Hao Z, Strickler PM - Kinetoplastid Biol Dis (2002)

Bottom Line: While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases.Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites.We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Section of Vector Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College St, 606 LEPH, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. serap.aksoy@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
At times of crisis when epidemics rage and begin to take their toll on affected populations, as we have been witnessing with African trypanosomiasis in subSahara, the dichotomy of basic versus applied research deepens. While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases. Here, we argue the need for additional research in one under-investigated area, that is the biology of the tsetse vector. Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites. We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Symbiont-based transgenic approaches. The cultivation, genetic transformationand reintroduction of recombinant symbionts to tsetse by micro injection is schematically depicted.
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Figure 3: Symbiont-based transgenic approaches. The cultivation, genetic transformationand reintroduction of recombinant symbionts to tsetse by micro injection is schematically depicted.

Mentions: Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of trypanosome transmission in tsetse is of fundamental significance, but in addition these experiments can result in new applications for vector control. Since the symbiont-based transformation system can be used with ease to express gene products in tsetse midgut, these studies are also of significance to identify candidate genes that can be expressed to confer refractoriness in tsetse (Schematically shown in Figure 3). From the preliminary studies with the tsetse immune system, it appears that trypanosomes have developed abilities to also manipulate their insect host to mediate their transmission. In future experiments, one of our goals is to understand how this very heightened immune sensitivity in the parasite infected tsetse host affects its viability and fecundity.


What can we hope to gain for trypanosomiasis control from molecular studies on tsetse biology ?

Aksoy S, Hao Z, Strickler PM - Kinetoplastid Biol Dis (2002)

Symbiont-based transgenic approaches. The cultivation, genetic transformationand reintroduction of recombinant symbionts to tsetse by micro injection is schematically depicted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC119325&req=5

Figure 3: Symbiont-based transgenic approaches. The cultivation, genetic transformationand reintroduction of recombinant symbionts to tsetse by micro injection is schematically depicted.
Mentions: Understanding the molecular and cellular basis of trypanosome transmission in tsetse is of fundamental significance, but in addition these experiments can result in new applications for vector control. Since the symbiont-based transformation system can be used with ease to express gene products in tsetse midgut, these studies are also of significance to identify candidate genes that can be expressed to confer refractoriness in tsetse (Schematically shown in Figure 3). From the preliminary studies with the tsetse immune system, it appears that trypanosomes have developed abilities to also manipulate their insect host to mediate their transmission. In future experiments, one of our goals is to understand how this very heightened immune sensitivity in the parasite infected tsetse host affects its viability and fecundity.

Bottom Line: While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases.Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites.We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Section of Vector Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College St, 606 LEPH, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. serap.aksoy@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
At times of crisis when epidemics rage and begin to take their toll on affected populations, as we have been witnessing with African trypanosomiasis in subSahara, the dichotomy of basic versus applied research deepens. While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases. Here, we argue the need for additional research in one under-investigated area, that is the biology of the tsetse vector. Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites. We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus