Limits...
What can we hope to gain for trypanosomiasis control from molecular studies on tsetse biology ?

Aksoy S, Hao Z, Strickler PM - Kinetoplastid Biol Dis (2002)

Bottom Line: While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases.Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites.We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Section of Vector Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College St, 606 LEPH, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. serap.aksoy@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
At times of crisis when epidemics rage and begin to take their toll on affected populations, as we have been witnessing with African trypanosomiasis in subSahara, the dichotomy of basic versus applied research deepens. While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases. Here, we argue the need for additional research in one under-investigated area, that is the biology of the tsetse vector. Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites. We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Regulation of attacin, defensin and diptericin expression in fat body after feeding pathogens in the bloodmeal. Northern blots were hybridized to GmAttA (A), GmDefA (B) and GmDipA (C) cDNAs and results are also schematically presented. Fat body RNA was analyzed 8 and 24 h following bloodstream trypanosome feeding (Lanes 1 and 2, respectively), 8 and 24 h after procyclic trypanosome feeding (Lanes 3 and 4, respectively), 8 and 24 h after E. coli feeding (Lanes 5 and 6, respectively) and 8 and 24 h after a normal bloodmeal (Lane 7 and 8, respectively). This is a representative example of three replicate experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC119325&req=5

Figure 1: Regulation of attacin, defensin and diptericin expression in fat body after feeding pathogens in the bloodmeal. Northern blots were hybridized to GmAttA (A), GmDefA (B) and GmDipA (C) cDNAs and results are also schematically presented. Fat body RNA was analyzed 8 and 24 h following bloodstream trypanosome feeding (Lanes 1 and 2, respectively), 8 and 24 h after procyclic trypanosome feeding (Lanes 3 and 4, respectively), 8 and 24 h after E. coli feeding (Lanes 5 and 6, respectively) and 8 and 24 h after a normal bloodmeal (Lane 7 and 8, respectively). This is a representative example of three replicate experiments.

Mentions: Recently, to understand the role of tsetse immune responses for trypanosome transmission, we characterized several immune marker genes (defensin, attacin and diptericin) from tsetse and studied their transcriptional regulation in vivo[22]. These results show that upon entry into the fly via the bloodmeal, trypanosomes fail to elicit a strong immune response, contrary to what is seen with Escherichia coli (Figure 1). Furthermore, tsetse immune responses can differentiate between the blood-stream form and procyclic parasites. The blood-stream form parasites which would be, acquired during the course of natural infections in the field, result in significantly less induction of the immune peptide gene transcription than their procyclic counterparts.


What can we hope to gain for trypanosomiasis control from molecular studies on tsetse biology ?

Aksoy S, Hao Z, Strickler PM - Kinetoplastid Biol Dis (2002)

Regulation of attacin, defensin and diptericin expression in fat body after feeding pathogens in the bloodmeal. Northern blots were hybridized to GmAttA (A), GmDefA (B) and GmDipA (C) cDNAs and results are also schematically presented. Fat body RNA was analyzed 8 and 24 h following bloodstream trypanosome feeding (Lanes 1 and 2, respectively), 8 and 24 h after procyclic trypanosome feeding (Lanes 3 and 4, respectively), 8 and 24 h after E. coli feeding (Lanes 5 and 6, respectively) and 8 and 24 h after a normal bloodmeal (Lane 7 and 8, respectively). This is a representative example of three replicate experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC119325&req=5

Figure 1: Regulation of attacin, defensin and diptericin expression in fat body after feeding pathogens in the bloodmeal. Northern blots were hybridized to GmAttA (A), GmDefA (B) and GmDipA (C) cDNAs and results are also schematically presented. Fat body RNA was analyzed 8 and 24 h following bloodstream trypanosome feeding (Lanes 1 and 2, respectively), 8 and 24 h after procyclic trypanosome feeding (Lanes 3 and 4, respectively), 8 and 24 h after E. coli feeding (Lanes 5 and 6, respectively) and 8 and 24 h after a normal bloodmeal (Lane 7 and 8, respectively). This is a representative example of three replicate experiments.
Mentions: Recently, to understand the role of tsetse immune responses for trypanosome transmission, we characterized several immune marker genes (defensin, attacin and diptericin) from tsetse and studied their transcriptional regulation in vivo[22]. These results show that upon entry into the fly via the bloodmeal, trypanosomes fail to elicit a strong immune response, contrary to what is seen with Escherichia coli (Figure 1). Furthermore, tsetse immune responses can differentiate between the blood-stream form and procyclic parasites. The blood-stream form parasites which would be, acquired during the course of natural infections in the field, result in significantly less induction of the immune peptide gene transcription than their procyclic counterparts.

Bottom Line: While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases.Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites.We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Section of Vector Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College St, 606 LEPH, New Haven, CT 06510, USA. serap.aksoy@yale.edu

ABSTRACT
At times of crisis when epidemics rage and begin to take their toll on affected populations, as we have been witnessing with African trypanosomiasis in subSahara, the dichotomy of basic versus applied research deepens. While undoubtedly the treatment of thousands of infected people is the top priority, without continued research and development on the biology of disease agents and on ecological and evolutionary forces impacting these epidemics, little progress can be gained in the long run for the eventual control of these diseases. Here, we argue the need for additional research in one under-investigated area, that is the biology of the tsetse vector. Lacking are studies aimed to understand the genetic and cellular basis of tsetse interactions with trypanosomes as well as the genetic and biochemical basis of its ability to transmit these parasites. We discuss how this knowledge has the potential to contribute to the development of new vector control strategies as well as to improve the efficacy and affordability of the existing control approaches.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus