Limits...
From the cell biology to the development of new chemotherapeutic approaches against trypanosomatids: dreams and reality.

De Souza W - Kinetoplastid Biol Dis (2002)

Bottom Line: These organisms are also of biological interest since they are able to change the morphology according to the environment where they live, through a process of reversible cell transformation, and possess structures and organelles that are not found in mammalian cells.In addition, the present knowledge of structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the plasma membrane, the sub-pellicular microtubules, the flagellum, the kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, the peroxisome (glycosome), the acidocalcisome and the structures and organelles involved in the endocytic pathway, is reviewed from a cell biology perspective.The possible use of available data for the development of new anti parasite drugs is also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Ultraestrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCSBloco G, 21941900, Rio de JaneiroRJ, Brasil. wsouza@biof.ufrj.br

ABSTRACT
Members of the Trypanosomatidae family comprise a large number of species that are causative agents of important diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease and Leishmaniasis. These organisms are also of biological interest since they are able to change the morphology according to the environment where they live, through a process of reversible cell transformation, and possess structures and organelles that are not found in mammalian cells. This review analyses the process of transformation, which takes place during the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Special attention is given to the interaction of the parasite with vertebrate cells. In addition, the present knowledge of structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the plasma membrane, the sub-pellicular microtubules, the flagellum, the kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, the peroxisome (glycosome), the acidocalcisome and the structures and organelles involved in the endocytic pathway, is reviewed from a cell biology perspective. The possible use of available data for the development of new anti parasite drugs is also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Thin section showing the initial internalization of proteins through the cytostome (arrow).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC119324&req=5

Figure 21: Thin section showing the initial internalization of proteins through the cytostome (arrow).

Mentions: It has been shown that when epimastigotes are incubated in the presence of gold labelled macromolecules such as transferrin, LDL, etc., they initially bind to the cytostome region and then are internalized via endocytic vesicles, which are formed at the bottom of the cytopharynx (Fig. 21). The LDL incorporated by the protozoan is subsequently processed in the reservosome, cholesterol is directly incorporated into the cell membranes since T. cruzi is not able to synthesize this sterol. It has been shown that in the absence of preformed cholesterol T. cruzi is able to synthesize ergosterol and this information has been used for the development of new anti parasite drugs. Following binding to the cytostome macromolecules are rapidly internalized via the cytopharinx and appear in small endocytic vesicles which bud from the deepst region of this structure. Subsequently, these vesicles fuse to each other to form tubular structures that can be observed in the most central portion of the protozoan. Later on the macromolecules are concentrated in structures known as the reservosome [86] (Fig. 22).


From the cell biology to the development of new chemotherapeutic approaches against trypanosomatids: dreams and reality.

De Souza W - Kinetoplastid Biol Dis (2002)

Thin section showing the initial internalization of proteins through the cytostome (arrow).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC119324&req=5

Figure 21: Thin section showing the initial internalization of proteins through the cytostome (arrow).
Mentions: It has been shown that when epimastigotes are incubated in the presence of gold labelled macromolecules such as transferrin, LDL, etc., they initially bind to the cytostome region and then are internalized via endocytic vesicles, which are formed at the bottom of the cytopharynx (Fig. 21). The LDL incorporated by the protozoan is subsequently processed in the reservosome, cholesterol is directly incorporated into the cell membranes since T. cruzi is not able to synthesize this sterol. It has been shown that in the absence of preformed cholesterol T. cruzi is able to synthesize ergosterol and this information has been used for the development of new anti parasite drugs. Following binding to the cytostome macromolecules are rapidly internalized via the cytopharinx and appear in small endocytic vesicles which bud from the deepst region of this structure. Subsequently, these vesicles fuse to each other to form tubular structures that can be observed in the most central portion of the protozoan. Later on the macromolecules are concentrated in structures known as the reservosome [86] (Fig. 22).

Bottom Line: These organisms are also of biological interest since they are able to change the morphology according to the environment where they live, through a process of reversible cell transformation, and possess structures and organelles that are not found in mammalian cells.In addition, the present knowledge of structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the plasma membrane, the sub-pellicular microtubules, the flagellum, the kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, the peroxisome (glycosome), the acidocalcisome and the structures and organelles involved in the endocytic pathway, is reviewed from a cell biology perspective.The possible use of available data for the development of new anti parasite drugs is also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Ultraestrutura Celular Hertha Meyer, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCSBloco G, 21941900, Rio de JaneiroRJ, Brasil. wsouza@biof.ufrj.br

ABSTRACT
Members of the Trypanosomatidae family comprise a large number of species that are causative agents of important diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease and Leishmaniasis. These organisms are also of biological interest since they are able to change the morphology according to the environment where they live, through a process of reversible cell transformation, and possess structures and organelles that are not found in mammalian cells. This review analyses the process of transformation, which takes place during the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. Special attention is given to the interaction of the parasite with vertebrate cells. In addition, the present knowledge of structures and organelles such as the nucleus, the plasma membrane, the sub-pellicular microtubules, the flagellum, the kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, the peroxisome (glycosome), the acidocalcisome and the structures and organelles involved in the endocytic pathway, is reviewed from a cell biology perspective. The possible use of available data for the development of new anti parasite drugs is also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus