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Age related clinical features of childhood coeliac disease in Australia.

Stone ML, Bohane TD, Whitten KE, Tobias VH, Day AS - BMC Pediatr (2005)

Bottom Line: The most common presenting features in younger children were diarrhoea, irritability and weight loss.However, in older children, abdominal pain was the most common presenting feature.We found a significant difference in the clinical features of coeliac disease in pre-school compared to school age children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Paediatrics, Sydney Children's Hospital, High St Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia. stonem@sesahs.nsw.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Background: To describe the presenting clinical features of coeliac disease in a single paediatric centre, and to determine if the presenting features vary with age.

Methods: A review was conducted of children who had been referred with clinical suspicion of coeliac disease to the paediatric gastroenterology department of a tertiary paediatric hospital in Sydney, Australia. Coeliac disease was defined using standard histological criteria. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively.

Results: Clinical data were available for 74 cases of proven coeliac disease. Only 9% of patients were less than 2 years of age at diagnosis. Pre-school children (age < 5 years) presented with different symptoms to school children (age > or = 5 years). The most common presenting features in younger children were diarrhoea, irritability and weight loss. However, in older children, abdominal pain was the most common presenting feature.

Conclusion: We found a significant difference in the clinical features of coeliac disease in pre-school compared to school age children.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Age at Presentation of Coeliac disease in the cohort of 74 subjects. This figure illustrates the age distribution of the 74 subjects with coeliac disease in this study. Infants less than 2 years of age represented only 12% of the population. 27% of subjects were aged between 4 and 5 years, 36% were aged between 5 and 10 years, 26% were more than 10 years.
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Figure 1: Age at Presentation of Coeliac disease in the cohort of 74 subjects. This figure illustrates the age distribution of the 74 subjects with coeliac disease in this study. Infants less than 2 years of age represented only 12% of the population. 27% of subjects were aged between 4 and 5 years, 36% were aged between 5 and 10 years, 26% were more than 10 years.

Mentions: A total of 119 patients were identified over the six year period. Forty-three patients were excluded as there was another medical reason to explain their histological features or reason for dietetic referral. The medical records were unable to be located for two patients, leaving 74 subjects with coeliac disease available for analysis. The male: female ratio of patients was 1:2. The age at diagnosis ranged from 11 months to 14 years with median of 5.5 years. Seven patients (9% of total group) were less than 2 years of age (Figure 1). The ethnic mix (based on country of birth) of all admissions to SCH consists of approximately 94% Australian, 2% Asian, 1% UK and Europe, 0.05% Africa, and 0.02% Pacific Islands (data compiled by MS using admission data for Sydney Children's Hospital for 2002).


Age related clinical features of childhood coeliac disease in Australia.

Stone ML, Bohane TD, Whitten KE, Tobias VH, Day AS - BMC Pediatr (2005)

Age at Presentation of Coeliac disease in the cohort of 74 subjects. This figure illustrates the age distribution of the 74 subjects with coeliac disease in this study. Infants less than 2 years of age represented only 12% of the population. 27% of subjects were aged between 4 and 5 years, 36% were aged between 5 and 10 years, 26% were more than 10 years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1173112&req=5

Figure 1: Age at Presentation of Coeliac disease in the cohort of 74 subjects. This figure illustrates the age distribution of the 74 subjects with coeliac disease in this study. Infants less than 2 years of age represented only 12% of the population. 27% of subjects were aged between 4 and 5 years, 36% were aged between 5 and 10 years, 26% were more than 10 years.
Mentions: A total of 119 patients were identified over the six year period. Forty-three patients were excluded as there was another medical reason to explain their histological features or reason for dietetic referral. The medical records were unable to be located for two patients, leaving 74 subjects with coeliac disease available for analysis. The male: female ratio of patients was 1:2. The age at diagnosis ranged from 11 months to 14 years with median of 5.5 years. Seven patients (9% of total group) were less than 2 years of age (Figure 1). The ethnic mix (based on country of birth) of all admissions to SCH consists of approximately 94% Australian, 2% Asian, 1% UK and Europe, 0.05% Africa, and 0.02% Pacific Islands (data compiled by MS using admission data for Sydney Children's Hospital for 2002).

Bottom Line: The most common presenting features in younger children were diarrhoea, irritability and weight loss.However, in older children, abdominal pain was the most common presenting feature.We found a significant difference in the clinical features of coeliac disease in pre-school compared to school age children.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Paediatrics, Sydney Children's Hospital, High St Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia. stonem@sesahs.nsw.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Background: To describe the presenting clinical features of coeliac disease in a single paediatric centre, and to determine if the presenting features vary with age.

Methods: A review was conducted of children who had been referred with clinical suspicion of coeliac disease to the paediatric gastroenterology department of a tertiary paediatric hospital in Sydney, Australia. Coeliac disease was defined using standard histological criteria. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively.

Results: Clinical data were available for 74 cases of proven coeliac disease. Only 9% of patients were less than 2 years of age at diagnosis. Pre-school children (age < 5 years) presented with different symptoms to school children (age > or = 5 years). The most common presenting features in younger children were diarrhoea, irritability and weight loss. However, in older children, abdominal pain was the most common presenting feature.

Conclusion: We found a significant difference in the clinical features of coeliac disease in pre-school compared to school age children.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus