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Pulse pressure and age at menopause.

Luoto R, Sharrett AR, Eigenbrodt M, Arnett D - BMC Womens Health (2002)

Bottom Line: While menopausal age was not associated cross-sectionally with PP, early age at menopause (age<45) was significantly and independently associated with a slightly larger increase in PP (8.4, 95% CI 7.0-9.8) than later menopause (6.5, 95% CI 5.8;7.2).However, among normotensive women the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.07, 6.1 vs 4.7).CONCLUSIONS: Early age at menopause may be related to a greater increase in arterial stiffness, but the effect appears to be small and further evidence is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NHLBI, NIH, Two Rockledge Centre 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7934 Bethesda, 20892, USA. riitta.luoto@uta.fi

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to study the association of early age at menopause with pulse pressure (PP), a marker of arterial stiffness, and PP change. METHODS: The effect of natural menopause was studied in 2484 women from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study who had not used hormone replacement therapy and who had not had a hysterectomy. The cross-sectional association of age with PP was evaluated in the entire cohort. The cross-sectional association of recalled age at menopause was evaluated in the 1688 women who were postmenopausal at baseline. PP change over 6 years was assessed in relation to menopausal age separately in women who were postmenopausal at baseline and in those whose menopause occurred during the 6-year interval. RESULTS: Chronological age was strongly and positively associated with PP in cross-sectional analyses, but not independently associated with PP change. While menopausal age was not associated cross-sectionally with PP, early age at menopause (age<45) was significantly and independently associated with a slightly larger increase in PP (8.4, 95% CI 7.0-9.8) than later menopause (6.5, 95% CI 5.8;7.2). However, among normotensive women the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.07, 6.1 vs 4.7). CONCLUSIONS: Early age at menopause may be related to a greater increase in arterial stiffness, but the effect appears to be small and further evidence is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure at baseline and 6-year follow-up visits by chronological age at baseline among non-hysterectomized women without HRT.
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Figure 1: Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure at baseline and 6-year follow-up visits by chronological age at baseline among non-hysterectomized women without HRT.

Mentions: In the cross-sectional analyses, at baseline and at the 6-year follow-up, systolic blood pressure was strongly positively associated with chronological age, but diastolic BP varied little with age (Figure 1). Thus, the difference between SBP and DBP, i.e. pulse pressure, increased with age. In the baseline data, average pulse pressure was 42.3 mmHg in women aged 45 to 46 years and increased monotonically to 56.5 mmHg in the oldest women aged 62–64 years (Table 3). Linear trends in both cross-sectional associations between baseline age and baseline PP as well as between baseline age and PP at 6-year follow-up, were highly significant (p=.0001) even after adjusting for race and hypertensive medication use. Longitudinally there was a significant relationship (p=.0001) between 6-year change in pulse pressure and chronological age at baseline after adjustment for baseline PP, race, hypertensive medication use, ARIC field center and smoking (Table 1). This relationship did not remain significant after additional adjustment for measurement error (p = 0.23).


Pulse pressure and age at menopause.

Luoto R, Sharrett AR, Eigenbrodt M, Arnett D - BMC Womens Health (2002)

Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure at baseline and 6-year follow-up visits by chronological age at baseline among non-hysterectomized women without HRT.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC117223&req=5

Figure 1: Systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure at baseline and 6-year follow-up visits by chronological age at baseline among non-hysterectomized women without HRT.
Mentions: In the cross-sectional analyses, at baseline and at the 6-year follow-up, systolic blood pressure was strongly positively associated with chronological age, but diastolic BP varied little with age (Figure 1). Thus, the difference between SBP and DBP, i.e. pulse pressure, increased with age. In the baseline data, average pulse pressure was 42.3 mmHg in women aged 45 to 46 years and increased monotonically to 56.5 mmHg in the oldest women aged 62–64 years (Table 3). Linear trends in both cross-sectional associations between baseline age and baseline PP as well as between baseline age and PP at 6-year follow-up, were highly significant (p=.0001) even after adjusting for race and hypertensive medication use. Longitudinally there was a significant relationship (p=.0001) between 6-year change in pulse pressure and chronological age at baseline after adjustment for baseline PP, race, hypertensive medication use, ARIC field center and smoking (Table 1). This relationship did not remain significant after additional adjustment for measurement error (p = 0.23).

Bottom Line: While menopausal age was not associated cross-sectionally with PP, early age at menopause (age<45) was significantly and independently associated with a slightly larger increase in PP (8.4, 95% CI 7.0-9.8) than later menopause (6.5, 95% CI 5.8;7.2).However, among normotensive women the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.07, 6.1 vs 4.7).CONCLUSIONS: Early age at menopause may be related to a greater increase in arterial stiffness, but the effect appears to be small and further evidence is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: NHLBI, NIH, Two Rockledge Centre 6701 Rockledge Drive, MSC 7934 Bethesda, 20892, USA. riitta.luoto@uta.fi

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to study the association of early age at menopause with pulse pressure (PP), a marker of arterial stiffness, and PP change. METHODS: The effect of natural menopause was studied in 2484 women from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study who had not used hormone replacement therapy and who had not had a hysterectomy. The cross-sectional association of age with PP was evaluated in the entire cohort. The cross-sectional association of recalled age at menopause was evaluated in the 1688 women who were postmenopausal at baseline. PP change over 6 years was assessed in relation to menopausal age separately in women who were postmenopausal at baseline and in those whose menopause occurred during the 6-year interval. RESULTS: Chronological age was strongly and positively associated with PP in cross-sectional analyses, but not independently associated with PP change. While menopausal age was not associated cross-sectionally with PP, early age at menopause (age<45) was significantly and independently associated with a slightly larger increase in PP (8.4, 95% CI 7.0-9.8) than later menopause (6.5, 95% CI 5.8;7.2). However, among normotensive women the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.07, 6.1 vs 4.7). CONCLUSIONS: Early age at menopause may be related to a greater increase in arterial stiffness, but the effect appears to be small and further evidence is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus