Limits...
Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome.

Wyatt KM, Dimmock PW, Frischer M, Jones PW, O'Brien SP - BMC Womens Health (2002)

Bottom Line: Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS) have been made.Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment.Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Exeter and North Devon RDSU, 1st floor Noy Scott House, Haldon View Terrace, Wonford Road, Exeter, UK. k.m.wyatt@ex.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS) have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993-1998) within a computerised general practitioner database. METHODS: Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993-1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients RESULTS: Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC117222&req=5

Mentions: The proportions of repeat and acute prescriptions were determined for each drug group over the study period. The proportions could provide an indication of whether the women perceive the treatment to be efficacious; the greater the number of repeat prescriptions, then presumably the more successful the treatment is perceived as being. The variation in the ratio of repeat and acute prescriptions remained consistent across the study period for each group of drugs apart from diuretics. (The only significant difference in the number of acute and repeat prescriptions over time was for the subgroup of diuretics which showed a significant increase in the number of repeat prescriptions over the study period). However, there was some variation in the ratio of acute and repeat prescriptions when the yearly proportions of acute and repeat prescriptions for the individual drug groups were compared. Figure 3 shows the proportions of new and repeat prescriptions for the individual drug groups for 1996. Prescriptions linked to the diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome for tricyclic antidepressants were most likely to be repeated whereas prescriptions for oral contraceptives were the least likely to be repeated. Figure 3 also shows the general proportions of acute and repeat prescriptions, taken from reference [22].


Prescribing patterns in premenstrual syndrome.

Wyatt KM, Dimmock PW, Frischer M, Jones PW, O'Brien SP - BMC Womens Health (2002)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC117222&req=5

Mentions: The proportions of repeat and acute prescriptions were determined for each drug group over the study period. The proportions could provide an indication of whether the women perceive the treatment to be efficacious; the greater the number of repeat prescriptions, then presumably the more successful the treatment is perceived as being. The variation in the ratio of repeat and acute prescriptions remained consistent across the study period for each group of drugs apart from diuretics. (The only significant difference in the number of acute and repeat prescriptions over time was for the subgroup of diuretics which showed a significant increase in the number of repeat prescriptions over the study period). However, there was some variation in the ratio of acute and repeat prescriptions when the yearly proportions of acute and repeat prescriptions for the individual drug groups were compared. Figure 3 shows the proportions of new and repeat prescriptions for the individual drug groups for 1996. Prescriptions linked to the diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome for tricyclic antidepressants were most likely to be repeated whereas prescriptions for oral contraceptives were the least likely to be repeated. Figure 3 also shows the general proportions of acute and repeat prescriptions, taken from reference [22].

Bottom Line: Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS) have been made.Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment.Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Exeter and North Devon RDSU, 1st floor Noy Scott House, Haldon View Terrace, Wonford Road, Exeter, UK. k.m.wyatt@ex.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Over 300 therapies have been proposed for premenstrual syndrome. To date there has been only one survey conducted in the UK of PMS treatments prescribed by GPs, a questionnaire-based study by the National Association of Premenstrual Syndrome in 1989. Since then, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors have been licensed for severe PMS/PMDD, and governmental recommendations to reduce the dosage of vitamin B6 (the first choice over-the-counter treatment for many women with PMS) have been made. This study investigates the annual rates of diagnoses and prescribing patterns for premenstrual syndrome (1993-1998) within a computerised general practitioner database. METHODS: Retrospective survey of prescribing data for premenstrual syndrome between 1993-1998 using the General Practice Research Database for the West Midlands Region which contains information on 282,600 female patients RESULTS: Overall the proportion of women with a prescription-linked diagnosis of premenstrual syndrome has halved over the five years. Progestogens including progesterone were the most commonly recorded treatment for premenstrual syndrome during the whole study period accounting for over 40% of all prescriptions. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors accounted for only 2% of the prescriptions in 1993 but rose to over 16% by 1998, becoming the second most commonly recorded treatment. Vitamin B6 accounted for 22% of the prescriptions in 1993 but dropped markedly between 1997 and 1998 to 11%. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a yearly decrease in the number of prescriptions linked to diagnoses for premenstrual syndrome. Progestogens including progesterone, is the most widely prescribed treatment for premenstrual syndrome despite the lack of evidence demonstrating their efficacy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus