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Vaccine policy in India.

Madhavi Y - PLoS Med. (2005)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Science Technology and Development Studies, New Delhi, India. y_madhavi01@hotmail.com

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Soon, Indian vaccine institutes were also producing tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT), and diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT)... However, the benefits of this early institutionalisation did not last long... Vaccine requirements for India's EPI have been met mainly through the public-sector vaccine institutions, as was the case in most parts of the world until the 1980s... In 1987, the Union (federal) government's Department of Biotechnology established a new public sector unit, Bharat Immunologicals and Biologicals Corporation Ltd. (Bulandshar, India) with technology transferred from the Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitis (Moscow, Russia)... It is strange that there is no published analysis as to why OPV production in the Indian public sector has failed repeatedly while Panacea Biotec, an Indian private sector firm, has recently secured a comfortable position as a WHO pre-qualified supplier of OPV for UNICEF... Similarly, in 1989, the Union government's Department of Biotechnology established a new public sector unit, Indian Vaccine Corporation Ltd. (IVCOL) at Gurgaon, for the indigenous production of measles vaccine with technology transferred from Institut Merieux, a public sector company based in Lyons, France... And yet in vaccines, the tendency is to move toward a “one vaccine fits all” regime... This would be fine if the vaccines were specifically designed for universal use, but there was no attempt to conclusively establish that the imported vaccines actually suited the Indian strains of the pathogens before they were adopted... The first and foremost element in this strategy must be the decisive intervention of the Indian government to meet the shortfall in the UIP vaccines... This may be done either by strengthening the public sector wherever possible, or by taking suitable (and transparent) measures to encourage the indigenous private sector on a case-by-case basis to make safe and effective vaccines available at affordable prices... The suitability of imported vaccines to deal with Indian pathogenic strains also needs to be conclusively established wherever necessary... With a strong will and a small amount of planning, the current situation in India can be reversed, and India can even play a major role in meeting the global shortfall in the vaccines procured by UNICEF... Thirdly, a strong emphasis on in-house R&D is needed in order to ensure that our production technologies are in tune with the times, and to negotiate strategic partnerships with outside scientists or institutions and companies... Last but not least, the Indian government should actively encourage independent policy research, cost-benefit studies, and wider national consultations on various aspects of vaccination and public health so that it can take more informed decisions on such matters.

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The Growth of the Private Sector in the Indian Vaccine MarketThe data were compiled from the annual reports of Health Information of India (1970–1971 to 2001–2002), the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (Government of India) and MIMS India (www.mims-india.com), Nov 2001, New Delhi.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1140944&req=5

pmed-0020127-g003: The Growth of the Private Sector in the Indian Vaccine MarketThe data were compiled from the annual reports of Health Information of India (1970–1971 to 2001–2002), the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (Government of India) and MIMS India (www.mims-india.com), Nov 2001, New Delhi.

Mentions: One of the main reasons for the growing gap in demand for and supply of primary vaccines in India is that while public sector production is on the decline (Figure 1), vaccine availability from the private sector (Figures 1 and 2) or through the UNICEF procurement mechanism (based on global tenders from suppliers pre-approved by the WHO) has not improved. This is a part of a worrisome global trend that has been acknowledged by UNICEF (http://www.unicef.org/supply/index_vaccine_security.html).


Vaccine policy in India.

Madhavi Y - PLoS Med. (2005)

The Growth of the Private Sector in the Indian Vaccine MarketThe data were compiled from the annual reports of Health Information of India (1970–1971 to 2001–2002), the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (Government of India) and MIMS India (www.mims-india.com), Nov 2001, New Delhi.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1140944&req=5

pmed-0020127-g003: The Growth of the Private Sector in the Indian Vaccine MarketThe data were compiled from the annual reports of Health Information of India (1970–1971 to 2001–2002), the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (Government of India) and MIMS India (www.mims-india.com), Nov 2001, New Delhi.
Mentions: One of the main reasons for the growing gap in demand for and supply of primary vaccines in India is that while public sector production is on the decline (Figure 1), vaccine availability from the private sector (Figures 1 and 2) or through the UNICEF procurement mechanism (based on global tenders from suppliers pre-approved by the WHO) has not improved. This is a part of a worrisome global trend that has been acknowledged by UNICEF (http://www.unicef.org/supply/index_vaccine_security.html).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Institute of Science Technology and Development Studies, New Delhi, India. y_madhavi01@hotmail.com

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Soon, Indian vaccine institutes were also producing tetanus toxoid (TT), diphtheria toxoid (DT), and diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus toxoid (DPT)... However, the benefits of this early institutionalisation did not last long... Vaccine requirements for India's EPI have been met mainly through the public-sector vaccine institutions, as was the case in most parts of the world until the 1980s... In 1987, the Union (federal) government's Department of Biotechnology established a new public sector unit, Bharat Immunologicals and Biologicals Corporation Ltd. (Bulandshar, India) with technology transferred from the Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitis (Moscow, Russia)... It is strange that there is no published analysis as to why OPV production in the Indian public sector has failed repeatedly while Panacea Biotec, an Indian private sector firm, has recently secured a comfortable position as a WHO pre-qualified supplier of OPV for UNICEF... Similarly, in 1989, the Union government's Department of Biotechnology established a new public sector unit, Indian Vaccine Corporation Ltd. (IVCOL) at Gurgaon, for the indigenous production of measles vaccine with technology transferred from Institut Merieux, a public sector company based in Lyons, France... And yet in vaccines, the tendency is to move toward a “one vaccine fits all” regime... This would be fine if the vaccines were specifically designed for universal use, but there was no attempt to conclusively establish that the imported vaccines actually suited the Indian strains of the pathogens before they were adopted... The first and foremost element in this strategy must be the decisive intervention of the Indian government to meet the shortfall in the UIP vaccines... This may be done either by strengthening the public sector wherever possible, or by taking suitable (and transparent) measures to encourage the indigenous private sector on a case-by-case basis to make safe and effective vaccines available at affordable prices... The suitability of imported vaccines to deal with Indian pathogenic strains also needs to be conclusively established wherever necessary... With a strong will and a small amount of planning, the current situation in India can be reversed, and India can even play a major role in meeting the global shortfall in the vaccines procured by UNICEF... Thirdly, a strong emphasis on in-house R&D is needed in order to ensure that our production technologies are in tune with the times, and to negotiate strategic partnerships with outside scientists or institutions and companies... Last but not least, the Indian government should actively encourage independent policy research, cost-benefit studies, and wider national consultations on various aspects of vaccination and public health so that it can take more informed decisions on such matters.

Show MeSH