Limits...
Taking more than a fair share? The migration of health professionals from poor to rich countries.

Dovlo D - PLoS Med. (2005)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: dovlod@yahoo.com

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The international migration of health workers, especially of physicians and nurses but also increasingly of other health workers, has become a major global health concern... Recent meetings, such as the World Health Assembly of 2004 and the High-Level Forum on the Millennium Development Goals in December 2004, as well as a number of publications have highlighted the severe shortage of health personnel in poorer parts of the world and the rise in demand for health workers in rich countries... Thus, barely affordable initiatives towards capacity-building result instead in further losses of capacity... Policy-makers in sub-Saharan Africa must feel helpless when they are completely unable to match either the remuneration or the working conditions found in recipient countries... The authors reviewed these data for all physicians in the US who received their training in sub-Saharan Africa... What they found was that more than 23% of America's 771,491 physicians received their medical training outside the country, mostly (64%) in low-income or lower-middle-income countries... Thus, policies and actions that reduce medical and nursing school intake in poor countries while facilitating entry visas into rich countries for physicians and nurses from these same poor countries may be responsible for the deaths of thousands of African children and women... Effective international agreements on managing recruitment seem only to work when both source and recipient countries are developing countries... For example, South Africa has been successful at banning recruitment from within Africa, but richer countries opt for voluntary “codes of conduct” that are often quite ineffective... The migration of physicians and other trained health professionals undermines the ability of developing countries to meet agreed Millennium Development Goals and creates untenable health conditions for the poorer sections of their populations... Developing countries on their own cannot achieve effective moderation of migration and secure the integrity of health services without the cooperation and collaboration of the countries that receive their health workers... An international regimen is needed to manage and moderate the migration of health workers in order to minimize the deleterious effects this has on underdeveloped countries... Countries have different experiences, and each country must develop strategies that reflect the needs of their particular situation... However, the appropriate international environment for managing human resources is necessary if the strategies of developing countries are to achieve meaningful results.

Show MeSH
Association between Mortality and Health Worker Density(Illustration: Giovanni Maki, adapted from [9])
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1140940&req=5

pmed-0020109-g002: Association between Mortality and Health Worker Density(Illustration: Giovanni Maki, adapted from [9])

Mentions: The reality, though, is that facilitating the migration of health workers from poor countries contributes to worse health outcomes in these countries. Human Resources for Health: Overcoming the Crisis [9], a strategic report of the Joint Learning Initiative (a consortium of over 100 leaders in health), recently analyzed the global workforce [9]. The analysis considered the impact that the global distribution of health workers will have on reaching the health-related Millennium Development Goals. The report suggested that the low health worker density in some countries has already had a major impact on maternal and child mortality (Figure 2) [9]. For example, the report states: “the prospects for achieving 80 percent coverage of measles immunization and skilled attendants at birth are greatly enhanced where worker density exceeds 2.5 workers per 1,000 population. Seventy-five countries with 2.5 billion people are below this minimum threshold.” The report suggests that low health worker density has a particularly marked effect on maternal deaths: a 10% increase in the density of the health workforce is correlated with about a 5% decline in maternal mortality [9]. This strong effect of worker density on maternal health may be due to the fact that highly trained personnel are essential for emergency obstetric services.


Taking more than a fair share? The migration of health professionals from poor to rich countries.

Dovlo D - PLoS Med. (2005)

Association between Mortality and Health Worker Density(Illustration: Giovanni Maki, adapted from [9])
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1140940&req=5

pmed-0020109-g002: Association between Mortality and Health Worker Density(Illustration: Giovanni Maki, adapted from [9])
Mentions: The reality, though, is that facilitating the migration of health workers from poor countries contributes to worse health outcomes in these countries. Human Resources for Health: Overcoming the Crisis [9], a strategic report of the Joint Learning Initiative (a consortium of over 100 leaders in health), recently analyzed the global workforce [9]. The analysis considered the impact that the global distribution of health workers will have on reaching the health-related Millennium Development Goals. The report suggested that the low health worker density in some countries has already had a major impact on maternal and child mortality (Figure 2) [9]. For example, the report states: “the prospects for achieving 80 percent coverage of measles immunization and skilled attendants at birth are greatly enhanced where worker density exceeds 2.5 workers per 1,000 population. Seventy-five countries with 2.5 billion people are below this minimum threshold.” The report suggests that low health worker density has a particularly marked effect on maternal deaths: a 10% increase in the density of the health workforce is correlated with about a 5% decline in maternal mortality [9]. This strong effect of worker density on maternal health may be due to the fact that highly trained personnel are essential for emergency obstetric services.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: dovlod@yahoo.com

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The international migration of health workers, especially of physicians and nurses but also increasingly of other health workers, has become a major global health concern... Recent meetings, such as the World Health Assembly of 2004 and the High-Level Forum on the Millennium Development Goals in December 2004, as well as a number of publications have highlighted the severe shortage of health personnel in poorer parts of the world and the rise in demand for health workers in rich countries... Thus, barely affordable initiatives towards capacity-building result instead in further losses of capacity... Policy-makers in sub-Saharan Africa must feel helpless when they are completely unable to match either the remuneration or the working conditions found in recipient countries... The authors reviewed these data for all physicians in the US who received their training in sub-Saharan Africa... What they found was that more than 23% of America's 771,491 physicians received their medical training outside the country, mostly (64%) in low-income or lower-middle-income countries... Thus, policies and actions that reduce medical and nursing school intake in poor countries while facilitating entry visas into rich countries for physicians and nurses from these same poor countries may be responsible for the deaths of thousands of African children and women... Effective international agreements on managing recruitment seem only to work when both source and recipient countries are developing countries... For example, South Africa has been successful at banning recruitment from within Africa, but richer countries opt for voluntary “codes of conduct” that are often quite ineffective... The migration of physicians and other trained health professionals undermines the ability of developing countries to meet agreed Millennium Development Goals and creates untenable health conditions for the poorer sections of their populations... Developing countries on their own cannot achieve effective moderation of migration and secure the integrity of health services without the cooperation and collaboration of the countries that receive their health workers... An international regimen is needed to manage and moderate the migration of health workers in order to minimize the deleterious effects this has on underdeveloped countries... Countries have different experiences, and each country must develop strategies that reflect the needs of their particular situation... However, the appropriate international environment for managing human resources is necessary if the strategies of developing countries are to achieve meaningful results.

Show MeSH