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Impact of UVA exposure on psychological parameters and circulating serotonin and melatonin.

Gambichler T, Bader A, Vojvodic M, Bechara FG, Sauermann K, Altmeyer P, Hoffmann K - BMC Dermatol. (2002)

Bottom Line: By contrast, the controls did not show significant changes of psychological parameters.Both, for exposed and non-exposed volunteers serotonin and melatonin levels did not significantly differ at T1 and T3.Nevertheless, the positive psychological effects observed in our study cannot be attributed to circulating serotonin or melatonin.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany. t.gambichler@derma.de

ABSTRACT

Background: People tend to feel better after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This study was performed to investigate the impact of UVA exposure on psychological and neuroendocrine parameters.

Methods: Fifty-three volunteers were separated into 42 individuals who had UVA exposure and 11 individuals who had no UVA exposure. The UVA-exposed volunteers had irradiation sessions six times in a three-week period. All volunteers completed two questionnaires at baseline (T1) and at the end of the study (T3). For the determination of serotonin and melatonin serum levels of all volunteers blood samples were collected at baseline (T1), after the first UVA exposure (T2), and at the end of the study after the sixth exposure (T3).

Results: UVA-exposed volunteers felt significantly more balanced, less nervous, more strengthened, and more satisfied with their appearance at T3. By contrast, the controls did not show significant changes of psychological parameters. In comparison to T1 and T3, serum serotonin was significantly higher and the serum melatonin was significantly lower for the volunteers exposed to UVA at T2. Both, for exposed and non-exposed volunteers serotonin and melatonin levels did not significantly differ at T1 and T3.

Conclusions: It remains obscure, whether the exposure to UVA or other components of the treatment were responsible for the psychological benefits observed. The changes of circulating neuroendocrine mediators found after UVA exposure at T2 may be due to an UVA-induced effect via a cutaneous pathway. Nevertheless, the positive psychological effects observed in our study cannot be attributed to circulating serotonin or melatonin.

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Spectral irradiance of the fluorescence lamp used in this study.
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Figure 1: Spectral irradiance of the fluorescence lamp used in this study.

Mentions: The Ergoline Classic 450 Super Power sunbed (JK-Products GmbH, Windhagen, Germany) was used for whole-body irradiation. This air-conditioned tanning device was fitted with 42 Solarium Plus R1-12-100 W fluorescence lamps (Wolff System AG, Riegel, Germany). Before the beginning of the investigation, the spectral output of the lamps was measured with a calibrated MED 2000 spectroradiometer (Opsira GmbH, Weingarten, Germany). The integrated irradiance assessed spectroradiometrically at skin level was 17.5 mW/cm2 for UVA (means from 16 measure sites). Only a small fraction of UVB was measured (0.09 mW/cm2). Therefore the fluorescence lamp was defined as a UVA source. The emission spectrum of the fluorescence lamp is shown in Figure 1. UVA irradiance was routinely measured each exposure session with the UV-METER radiometer (Waldmann, Willingen-Schwenningen, Germany). Before each UVA dosimetry and exposure session the lamps underwent a warm-up period of 10 min [29]. The UVA dosage of each exposure session was 16 J/cm2 (skin type II) and 21 J/cm2 (skin type III), respectively. The dosage was given in line with the manufacturer's recommendations. The cumulative UVA doses were 96 J/cm2 for skin type II and 126 J/cm2 for skin type III. During sunbed exposure the volunteers wore goggles that were opaque to UV and visible light.


Impact of UVA exposure on psychological parameters and circulating serotonin and melatonin.

Gambichler T, Bader A, Vojvodic M, Bechara FG, Sauermann K, Altmeyer P, Hoffmann K - BMC Dermatol. (2002)

Spectral irradiance of the fluorescence lamp used in this study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC113771&req=5

Figure 1: Spectral irradiance of the fluorescence lamp used in this study.
Mentions: The Ergoline Classic 450 Super Power sunbed (JK-Products GmbH, Windhagen, Germany) was used for whole-body irradiation. This air-conditioned tanning device was fitted with 42 Solarium Plus R1-12-100 W fluorescence lamps (Wolff System AG, Riegel, Germany). Before the beginning of the investigation, the spectral output of the lamps was measured with a calibrated MED 2000 spectroradiometer (Opsira GmbH, Weingarten, Germany). The integrated irradiance assessed spectroradiometrically at skin level was 17.5 mW/cm2 for UVA (means from 16 measure sites). Only a small fraction of UVB was measured (0.09 mW/cm2). Therefore the fluorescence lamp was defined as a UVA source. The emission spectrum of the fluorescence lamp is shown in Figure 1. UVA irradiance was routinely measured each exposure session with the UV-METER radiometer (Waldmann, Willingen-Schwenningen, Germany). Before each UVA dosimetry and exposure session the lamps underwent a warm-up period of 10 min [29]. The UVA dosage of each exposure session was 16 J/cm2 (skin type II) and 21 J/cm2 (skin type III), respectively. The dosage was given in line with the manufacturer's recommendations. The cumulative UVA doses were 96 J/cm2 for skin type II and 126 J/cm2 for skin type III. During sunbed exposure the volunteers wore goggles that were opaque to UV and visible light.

Bottom Line: By contrast, the controls did not show significant changes of psychological parameters.Both, for exposed and non-exposed volunteers serotonin and melatonin levels did not significantly differ at T1 and T3.Nevertheless, the positive psychological effects observed in our study cannot be attributed to circulating serotonin or melatonin.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany. t.gambichler@derma.de

ABSTRACT

Background: People tend to feel better after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. This study was performed to investigate the impact of UVA exposure on psychological and neuroendocrine parameters.

Methods: Fifty-three volunteers were separated into 42 individuals who had UVA exposure and 11 individuals who had no UVA exposure. The UVA-exposed volunteers had irradiation sessions six times in a three-week period. All volunteers completed two questionnaires at baseline (T1) and at the end of the study (T3). For the determination of serotonin and melatonin serum levels of all volunteers blood samples were collected at baseline (T1), after the first UVA exposure (T2), and at the end of the study after the sixth exposure (T3).

Results: UVA-exposed volunteers felt significantly more balanced, less nervous, more strengthened, and more satisfied with their appearance at T3. By contrast, the controls did not show significant changes of psychological parameters. In comparison to T1 and T3, serum serotonin was significantly higher and the serum melatonin was significantly lower for the volunteers exposed to UVA at T2. Both, for exposed and non-exposed volunteers serotonin and melatonin levels did not significantly differ at T1 and T3.

Conclusions: It remains obscure, whether the exposure to UVA or other components of the treatment were responsible for the psychological benefits observed. The changes of circulating neuroendocrine mediators found after UVA exposure at T2 may be due to an UVA-induced effect via a cutaneous pathway. Nevertheless, the positive psychological effects observed in our study cannot be attributed to circulating serotonin or melatonin.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus