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Skin testing versus radioallergosorbent testing for indoor allergens.

Chinoy B, Yee E, Bahna SL - Clin Mol Allergy (2005)

Bottom Line: Test results were scored 0-4; ST >/= 2 + and RAST >/= 1 + were considered positive.Regardless of history of symptoms on exposure, ST was superior to RAST in detecting sensitization to cat epithelium and dog epidermal.Sensitizations to cat epithelium and dog epidermal are common, even in subjects who claimed no direct exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Allergy and Immunology Section, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. sbahna@lsuhsc.edu.

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Skin testing (ST) is the most common screening method for allergy evaluation. Measurement of serum specific IgE is also commonly used, but less so by allergists than by other practitioners. The sensitivity and specificity of these testing methods may vary by type of causative allergen and type of allergic manifestation. We compared ST reactivity with serum specific IgE antibodies to common indoor allergens in patients with respiratory allergies. METHODS: 118 patients (3 mo-58 yr, mean 12 yr) with allergic rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma had percutaneous skin testing (PST) supplemented by intradermal testing (ID) with those allergens suspected by history but showed negative PST. The sera were tested blindly for specific IgE antibodies by the radioallergosorbent test (Phadebas RAST). The allergens were D. farinae (118), cockroach (60), cat epithelium (90), and dog epidermal (90). Test results were scored 0-4; ST >/= 2 + and RAST >/= 1 + were considered positive. RESULTS: The two tests were in agreement (i.e., either both positive or both negative) in 52.2% (dog epidermal) to 62.2% (cat epithelium). When RAST was positive, ST was positive in 80% (dog epidermal) to 100% (cockroach mix). When ST was positive, RAST was positive in 16.3% (dog epidermal) to 50.0% (D. farinae). When RAST was negative, ST was positive in 48.5% (cat epithelium) to 69.6% (D. farinae). When ST was negative, RAST was positive in 0% (cockroach) to 5.6% (cat epithelium). The scores of ST and RAST showed weak to moderate correlation (r = 0.24 to 0.54). Regardless of history of symptoms on exposure, ST was superior to RAST in detecting sensitization to cat epithelium and dog epidermal. CONCLUSION: For all four indoor allergens tested, ST was more sensitive than RAST. When both tests were positive, their scores showed poor correlation. Sensitizations to cat epithelium and dog epidermal are common, even in subjects who claimed no direct exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison between skin testing & RAST for D. farinae in patients with respiratory allergy.
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Figure 1: Comparison between skin testing & RAST for D. farinae in patients with respiratory allergy.

Mentions: The concordances and discordances of ST (PST ± ID) and RAST are presented in Table 1. The two tests were in agreement (i.e., both positive or both negative) in 52.2% (dog epidermal) to 62.2% (cat epithelium). When RAST was positive, ST was also positive in 80% (dog epidermal) to 100% (cockroach mix). When ST was positive, RAST was also positive in 16.3% (dog epidermal) to 50.0% (D. farinae). When RAST was negative, ST was positive in 48.5% (cat epithelium) to 69.6% (D. farinae). When ST was negative, RAST was positive in 0% (cockroach) to 5.6% (cat epithelium). Comparisons of the RAST results with the results of PST and ID tests, separately or in combination, are presented in Figures 1, 2, 3, 4.


Skin testing versus radioallergosorbent testing for indoor allergens.

Chinoy B, Yee E, Bahna SL - Clin Mol Allergy (2005)

Comparison between skin testing & RAST for D. farinae in patients with respiratory allergy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1131913&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison between skin testing & RAST for D. farinae in patients with respiratory allergy.
Mentions: The concordances and discordances of ST (PST ± ID) and RAST are presented in Table 1. The two tests were in agreement (i.e., both positive or both negative) in 52.2% (dog epidermal) to 62.2% (cat epithelium). When RAST was positive, ST was also positive in 80% (dog epidermal) to 100% (cockroach mix). When ST was positive, RAST was also positive in 16.3% (dog epidermal) to 50.0% (D. farinae). When RAST was negative, ST was positive in 48.5% (cat epithelium) to 69.6% (D. farinae). When ST was negative, RAST was positive in 0% (cockroach) to 5.6% (cat epithelium). Comparisons of the RAST results with the results of PST and ID tests, separately or in combination, are presented in Figures 1, 2, 3, 4.

Bottom Line: Test results were scored 0-4; ST >/= 2 + and RAST >/= 1 + were considered positive.Regardless of history of symptoms on exposure, ST was superior to RAST in detecting sensitization to cat epithelium and dog epidermal.Sensitizations to cat epithelium and dog epidermal are common, even in subjects who claimed no direct exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Allergy and Immunology Section, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; Shreveport, Louisiana, USA. sbahna@lsuhsc.edu.

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Skin testing (ST) is the most common screening method for allergy evaluation. Measurement of serum specific IgE is also commonly used, but less so by allergists than by other practitioners. The sensitivity and specificity of these testing methods may vary by type of causative allergen and type of allergic manifestation. We compared ST reactivity with serum specific IgE antibodies to common indoor allergens in patients with respiratory allergies. METHODS: 118 patients (3 mo-58 yr, mean 12 yr) with allergic rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma had percutaneous skin testing (PST) supplemented by intradermal testing (ID) with those allergens suspected by history but showed negative PST. The sera were tested blindly for specific IgE antibodies by the radioallergosorbent test (Phadebas RAST). The allergens were D. farinae (118), cockroach (60), cat epithelium (90), and dog epidermal (90). Test results were scored 0-4; ST >/= 2 + and RAST >/= 1 + were considered positive. RESULTS: The two tests were in agreement (i.e., either both positive or both negative) in 52.2% (dog epidermal) to 62.2% (cat epithelium). When RAST was positive, ST was positive in 80% (dog epidermal) to 100% (cockroach mix). When ST was positive, RAST was positive in 16.3% (dog epidermal) to 50.0% (D. farinae). When RAST was negative, ST was positive in 48.5% (cat epithelium) to 69.6% (D. farinae). When ST was negative, RAST was positive in 0% (cockroach) to 5.6% (cat epithelium). The scores of ST and RAST showed weak to moderate correlation (r = 0.24 to 0.54). Regardless of history of symptoms on exposure, ST was superior to RAST in detecting sensitization to cat epithelium and dog epidermal. CONCLUSION: For all four indoor allergens tested, ST was more sensitive than RAST. When both tests were positive, their scores showed poor correlation. Sensitizations to cat epithelium and dog epidermal are common, even in subjects who claimed no direct exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus