Limits...
Cardiac auscultation training of medical students: a comparison of electronic sensor-based and acoustic stethoscopes.

Høyte H, Jensen T, Gjesdal K - BMC Med Educ (2005)

Bottom Line: The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points.No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65).None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway. henning_hoyte@yahoo.no

ABSTRACT

Background: To determine whether the use of an electronic, sensor based stethoscope affects the cardiac auscultation skills of undergraduate medical students.

Methods: Forty eight third year medical students were randomized to use either an electronic stethoscope, or a conventional acoustic stethoscope during clinical auscultation training. After a training period of four months, cardiac auscultation skills were evaluated using four patients with different cardiac murmurs. Two experienced cardiologists determined correct answers. The students completed a questionnaire for each patient. The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points.

Results: No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65). Grading and characterisation of murmurs and, if present, report of non existing murmurs were also rated. None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups.

Conclusion: Whether an electronic or a conventional stethoscope was used during training and testing did not affect the students' performance on a cardiac auscultation test.

Show MeSH
The number of students distributed on intervals of points.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1131903&req=5

Figure 1: The number of students distributed on intervals of points.

Mentions: The number of questionnaires scored was 78 and equal in the two groups. The total score in the control group was 1341.5 points versus 1388.5 in the intervention group. Mean scores in the control group and intervention group were 17.2 (SD = 8.7, range 1–30.5) and 17.8 (SD = 8.8, range 0–35) points respectively. The difference is 0.6 points with a 95% CI of (-0.33 – 1.53) points (p = 0.65). (Figure 1)


Cardiac auscultation training of medical students: a comparison of electronic sensor-based and acoustic stethoscopes.

Høyte H, Jensen T, Gjesdal K - BMC Med Educ (2005)

The number of students distributed on intervals of points.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1131903&req=5

Figure 1: The number of students distributed on intervals of points.
Mentions: The number of questionnaires scored was 78 and equal in the two groups. The total score in the control group was 1341.5 points versus 1388.5 in the intervention group. Mean scores in the control group and intervention group were 17.2 (SD = 8.7, range 1–30.5) and 17.8 (SD = 8.8, range 0–35) points respectively. The difference is 0.6 points with a 95% CI of (-0.33 – 1.53) points (p = 0.65). (Figure 1)

Bottom Line: The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points.No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65).None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo, Norway. henning_hoyte@yahoo.no

ABSTRACT

Background: To determine whether the use of an electronic, sensor based stethoscope affects the cardiac auscultation skills of undergraduate medical students.

Methods: Forty eight third year medical students were randomized to use either an electronic stethoscope, or a conventional acoustic stethoscope during clinical auscultation training. After a training period of four months, cardiac auscultation skills were evaluated using four patients with different cardiac murmurs. Two experienced cardiologists determined correct answers. The students completed a questionnaire for each patient. The thirteen questions were weighted according to their relative importance, and a correct answer was credited from one to six points.

Results: No difference in mean score was found between the two groups (p = 0.65). Grading and characterisation of murmurs and, if present, report of non existing murmurs were also rated. None of these yielded any significant differences between the groups.

Conclusion: Whether an electronic or a conventional stethoscope was used during training and testing did not affect the students' performance on a cardiac auscultation test.

Show MeSH