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Patterns in abundance and diversity of faecally dispersed parasites of tiger in Tadoba National Park, central India.

Marathe RR, Goel SS, Ranade SP, Jog MM, Watve MG - BMC Ecol. (2002)

Bottom Line: Across all genera of parasites variance scaled with the square of the mean and there was a significant positive correlation between prevalence and abundance.There was no significant association between different types of parasites.If we assume each of the clusters to represent individual tigers that were sampled repeatedly and that resident tigers are more likely to be sampled repeatedly, the presumed transient tigers had significantly greater parasite loads than the presumed resident ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Abasaheb Garware College, Pune 411 004, India. rahul_marathe@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Importance of parasites in ecological and evolutionary interactions is being increasingly recognized. However, ecological data on parasites of important host species is still scanty. We analyze the patterns seen in the faecal parasites of tigers in the Tadoba National Park, India, and speculate on the factors and processes shaping the parasite community and the possible implications for tiger ecology.

Results: The prevalence and intensities were high and the parasite community was dominated by indirect life cycle parasites. Across all genera of parasites variance scaled with the square of the mean and there was a significant positive correlation between prevalence and abundance. There was no significant association between different types of parasites.

Conclusions: The 70 samples analyzed formed 14 distinct clusters. If we assume each of the clusters to represent individual tigers that were sampled repeatedly and that resident tigers are more likely to be sampled repeatedly, the presumed transient tigers had significantly greater parasite loads than the presumed resident ones.

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The areas over which samples from individual clusters were collected were marked using the principle of minimum convex polygon. The sizes of the resultant ranges and their overlaps are comparable to those of individual tigers obtained by radiotelemetry (Karanth and Sunquist 2000).
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Figure 4: The areas over which samples from individual clusters were collected were marked using the principle of minimum convex polygon. The sizes of the resultant ranges and their overlaps are comparable to those of individual tigers obtained by radiotelemetry (Karanth and Sunquist 2000).

Mentions: Out of the 14 clusters recognized 4 were represented by a number of samples and 10 were single samples. The territory holding resident tigers are very likely to be sampled repeatedly whereas the non-resident transients that may have visited the study area occasionally could have been sampled only once. If the larger clusters represented resident tigers the study area could have 4 resident tigers and an unestimated but certainly a larger number of non-resident tigers. Out of the four large clusters, cluster 3 consisted of zero or low density (< 5/g) of propagules. The propagules however belonged to three different parasites in different samples namely ascarid, Taenia and lungworms. Therefore the cluster might represent up to three individuals raising the possible number of resident tigers to 6. The cluster 5 consisted of samples having between 5 to 20 Diphyllobothrium eggs per gram and no other parasite. The cluster 13 consisted of between 50 to 350 Diphyllobothrium eggs and occasional ascarid eggs and the cluster 14 consisted of a large number (500–4000) of Diphyllobothrium eggs with a low to moderate number of Taenia and Ascarid or lungworm. If the areas over which each of the four large clusters was sampled (fig 4) were considered as home ranges of individual tigers, the home range sizes were 49.25 Km2 for cluster 3, 46.75 Km2 for cluster 14, 31.2 Km2 for cluster 13 and 15.75 Km2 for cluster 5. The presumed home range sizes are close to the sizes of tiger home ranges in radio telemetry studies [34]. There was a considerable overlap in the distribution of the collection sites of the samples in different clusters. Very similar overlaps have been seen in radiotelemetry studies [34].


Patterns in abundance and diversity of faecally dispersed parasites of tiger in Tadoba National Park, central India.

Marathe RR, Goel SS, Ranade SP, Jog MM, Watve MG - BMC Ecol. (2002)

The areas over which samples from individual clusters were collected were marked using the principle of minimum convex polygon. The sizes of the resultant ranges and their overlaps are comparable to those of individual tigers obtained by radiotelemetry (Karanth and Sunquist 2000).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC111199&req=5

Figure 4: The areas over which samples from individual clusters were collected were marked using the principle of minimum convex polygon. The sizes of the resultant ranges and their overlaps are comparable to those of individual tigers obtained by radiotelemetry (Karanth and Sunquist 2000).
Mentions: Out of the 14 clusters recognized 4 were represented by a number of samples and 10 were single samples. The territory holding resident tigers are very likely to be sampled repeatedly whereas the non-resident transients that may have visited the study area occasionally could have been sampled only once. If the larger clusters represented resident tigers the study area could have 4 resident tigers and an unestimated but certainly a larger number of non-resident tigers. Out of the four large clusters, cluster 3 consisted of zero or low density (< 5/g) of propagules. The propagules however belonged to three different parasites in different samples namely ascarid, Taenia and lungworms. Therefore the cluster might represent up to three individuals raising the possible number of resident tigers to 6. The cluster 5 consisted of samples having between 5 to 20 Diphyllobothrium eggs per gram and no other parasite. The cluster 13 consisted of between 50 to 350 Diphyllobothrium eggs and occasional ascarid eggs and the cluster 14 consisted of a large number (500–4000) of Diphyllobothrium eggs with a low to moderate number of Taenia and Ascarid or lungworm. If the areas over which each of the four large clusters was sampled (fig 4) were considered as home ranges of individual tigers, the home range sizes were 49.25 Km2 for cluster 3, 46.75 Km2 for cluster 14, 31.2 Km2 for cluster 13 and 15.75 Km2 for cluster 5. The presumed home range sizes are close to the sizes of tiger home ranges in radio telemetry studies [34]. There was a considerable overlap in the distribution of the collection sites of the samples in different clusters. Very similar overlaps have been seen in radiotelemetry studies [34].

Bottom Line: Across all genera of parasites variance scaled with the square of the mean and there was a significant positive correlation between prevalence and abundance.There was no significant association between different types of parasites.If we assume each of the clusters to represent individual tigers that were sampled repeatedly and that resident tigers are more likely to be sampled repeatedly, the presumed transient tigers had significantly greater parasite loads than the presumed resident ones.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, Abasaheb Garware College, Pune 411 004, India. rahul_marathe@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Importance of parasites in ecological and evolutionary interactions is being increasingly recognized. However, ecological data on parasites of important host species is still scanty. We analyze the patterns seen in the faecal parasites of tigers in the Tadoba National Park, India, and speculate on the factors and processes shaping the parasite community and the possible implications for tiger ecology.

Results: The prevalence and intensities were high and the parasite community was dominated by indirect life cycle parasites. Across all genera of parasites variance scaled with the square of the mean and there was a significant positive correlation between prevalence and abundance. There was no significant association between different types of parasites.

Conclusions: The 70 samples analyzed formed 14 distinct clusters. If we assume each of the clusters to represent individual tigers that were sampled repeatedly and that resident tigers are more likely to be sampled repeatedly, the presumed transient tigers had significantly greater parasite loads than the presumed resident ones.

Show MeSH