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Discriminating between elderly and young using a fractal dimension analysis of centre of pressure.

Doyle TL, Dugan EL, Humphries B, Newton RU - Int J Med Sci (2004)

Bottom Line: Results indicated that both types of analyses are able to distinguish between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly group.However, the fractal dimension analysis more accurately detected differences between the participant groups when standing with their eyes closed.Based on these results it is suggested that fractal dimension analysis is more informative about posture control than traditional measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1School of Biomedical and Sports Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA 6027, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this project was to evaluate the use of a new analysis technique, fractal dimension analysis, for quantification of quiet stance centre of pressure (COP). By using a fractal dimension analysis of COP, it might be possible to gain more information about control during quiet stance than traditional analyses have previously allowed. The current project considered a group of young healthy participants and a group of elderly healthy participants to compare traditional measures of COP against a fractal dimension analysis of COP. Results indicated that both types of analyses are able to distinguish between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly group. However, the fractal dimension analysis more accurately detected differences between the participant groups when standing with their eyes closed. Based on these results it is suggested that fractal dimension analysis is more informative about posture control than traditional measures. It is suggested that a fractal dimension type of analysis can be incorporated into clinical testing to identify patients with pathologies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean(SD) results of fractal dimension analysis of COP in A/P direction. ^ indicate a significant difference between young and elderly in the eyes closed condition; * indicate a significant difference between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly only.
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Figure 2: Mean(SD) results of fractal dimension analysis of COP in A/P direction. ^ indicate a significant difference between young and elderly in the eyes closed condition; * indicate a significant difference between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly only.

Mentions: No fractal dimension differences were detected within the young group for either the A/P (EO = 1.48(0.09), EC = 1.47(0.08)) or M/L (EO = 1.65(0.12), EC = 1.64(0.13)) direction of COP (p > 0.05). The elderly group exhibited a significant increase in the fractal dimension, in the A/P direction only (EO = 1.51(0.08), EC = 1.58(0.09)), when asked to stand with their eyes closed compared to standing with their eyes open (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the fractal dimension of the M/L COP in the elderly group (EO = 1.60(0.12), EC = 1.60(0.11)). A between group difference existed such that the elderly group had a higher fractal dimension, in the A/P direction, than the young group when standing with eyes closed (p < 0.05). All data satisfied Levene's test for homogeneity. Results are displayed in Figures 2 and 3 .


Discriminating between elderly and young using a fractal dimension analysis of centre of pressure.

Doyle TL, Dugan EL, Humphries B, Newton RU - Int J Med Sci (2004)

Mean(SD) results of fractal dimension analysis of COP in A/P direction. ^ indicate a significant difference between young and elderly in the eyes closed condition; * indicate a significant difference between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly only.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1074506&req=5

Figure 2: Mean(SD) results of fractal dimension analysis of COP in A/P direction. ^ indicate a significant difference between young and elderly in the eyes closed condition; * indicate a significant difference between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly only.
Mentions: No fractal dimension differences were detected within the young group for either the A/P (EO = 1.48(0.09), EC = 1.47(0.08)) or M/L (EO = 1.65(0.12), EC = 1.64(0.13)) direction of COP (p > 0.05). The elderly group exhibited a significant increase in the fractal dimension, in the A/P direction only (EO = 1.51(0.08), EC = 1.58(0.09)), when asked to stand with their eyes closed compared to standing with their eyes open (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the fractal dimension of the M/L COP in the elderly group (EO = 1.60(0.12), EC = 1.60(0.11)). A between group difference existed such that the elderly group had a higher fractal dimension, in the A/P direction, than the young group when standing with eyes closed (p < 0.05). All data satisfied Levene's test for homogeneity. Results are displayed in Figures 2 and 3 .

Bottom Line: Results indicated that both types of analyses are able to distinguish between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly group.However, the fractal dimension analysis more accurately detected differences between the participant groups when standing with their eyes closed.Based on these results it is suggested that fractal dimension analysis is more informative about posture control than traditional measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1School of Biomedical and Sports Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, WA 6027, Australia.

ABSTRACT
The aim of this project was to evaluate the use of a new analysis technique, fractal dimension analysis, for quantification of quiet stance centre of pressure (COP). By using a fractal dimension analysis of COP, it might be possible to gain more information about control during quiet stance than traditional analyses have previously allowed. The current project considered a group of young healthy participants and a group of elderly healthy participants to compare traditional measures of COP against a fractal dimension analysis of COP. Results indicated that both types of analyses are able to distinguish between eyes open and eyes closed in the elderly group. However, the fractal dimension analysis more accurately detected differences between the participant groups when standing with their eyes closed. Based on these results it is suggested that fractal dimension analysis is more informative about posture control than traditional measures. It is suggested that a fractal dimension type of analysis can be incorporated into clinical testing to identify patients with pathologies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus