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Snake Venom: Any Clue for Antibiotics and CAM?

de Lima DC, Alvarez Abreu P, de Freitas CC, Santos DO, Borges RO, Dos Santos TC, Mendes Cabral L, Rodrigues CR, Castro HC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2005)

Bottom Line: Lately several naturally occurring peptides presenting antimicrobial activity have been described in the literature.However, snake venoms, which are an enormous source of peptides, have not been fully explored for searching such molecules.The aim of this work is to review the basis of antimicrobial mechanisms revealing snake venom as a feasible source for searching an antibiotic prototype.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Lately several naturally occurring peptides presenting antimicrobial activity have been described in the literature. However, snake venoms, which are an enormous source of peptides, have not been fully explored for searching such molecules. The aim of this work is to review the basis of antimicrobial mechanisms revealing snake venom as a feasible source for searching an antibiotic prototype. Therefore, it includes (i) a description of the constituents of the snake venoms involved in their main biological effects during the envenomation process; (ii) examples of snake venom molecules of commercial use; (iii) mechanisms of action of known antibiotics; and (iv) how the microorganisms can be resistant to antibiotics. This review also shows that snake venoms are not totally unexplored sources for antibiotics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the emergence of resistant bacteria.
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fig2: Schematic representation of the emergence of resistant bacteria.

Mentions: The main effects of antibiotics are: (i) inducing the death of the agent (bactericidal effect); and/or (ii) inhibition of bacterial growth (bacteriostatic effect). Their targets are the essential biosynthetic process or routes of these microorganisms (85,87). Among them, the inhibition of the synthesis of cell membrane, nucleotides and peptide bonds interferes directly with survival, chromosome replication and protein synthesis, respectively, of the bacteria (Fig. 2). They can also act by increasing cell permeability, or inhibiting through binding to ribosomes, which prevents nucleotide polymerization (85,87).


Snake Venom: Any Clue for Antibiotics and CAM?

de Lima DC, Alvarez Abreu P, de Freitas CC, Santos DO, Borges RO, Dos Santos TC, Mendes Cabral L, Rodrigues CR, Castro HC - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2005)

Schematic representation of the emergence of resistant bacteria.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1062156&req=5

fig2: Schematic representation of the emergence of resistant bacteria.
Mentions: The main effects of antibiotics are: (i) inducing the death of the agent (bactericidal effect); and/or (ii) inhibition of bacterial growth (bacteriostatic effect). Their targets are the essential biosynthetic process or routes of these microorganisms (85,87). Among them, the inhibition of the synthesis of cell membrane, nucleotides and peptide bonds interferes directly with survival, chromosome replication and protein synthesis, respectively, of the bacteria (Fig. 2). They can also act by increasing cell permeability, or inhibiting through binding to ribosomes, which prevents nucleotide polymerization (85,87).

Bottom Line: Lately several naturally occurring peptides presenting antimicrobial activity have been described in the literature.However, snake venoms, which are an enormous source of peptides, have not been fully explored for searching such molecules.The aim of this work is to review the basis of antimicrobial mechanisms revealing snake venom as a feasible source for searching an antibiotic prototype.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Lately several naturally occurring peptides presenting antimicrobial activity have been described in the literature. However, snake venoms, which are an enormous source of peptides, have not been fully explored for searching such molecules. The aim of this work is to review the basis of antimicrobial mechanisms revealing snake venom as a feasible source for searching an antibiotic prototype. Therefore, it includes (i) a description of the constituents of the snake venoms involved in their main biological effects during the envenomation process; (ii) examples of snake venom molecules of commercial use; (iii) mechanisms of action of known antibiotics; and (iv) how the microorganisms can be resistant to antibiotics. This review also shows that snake venoms are not totally unexplored sources for antibiotics and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus