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Anti-stress and Adaptogenic Activity of l-Arginine Supplementation.

Gupta V, Gupta A, Saggu S, Divekar HM, Grover SK, Kumar R - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2004)

Bottom Line: The least effective adaptogenic dose of l-arginine was 100.0 mg/kg body weight.On recovery (T(rec) 37 degrees C) of control rats, there was a further decrease in CAT and plasma testosterone, and an increase in LDH. l-Arginine supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in plasma MDA, an increase in blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT levels maintained at control values and a lower increase in LDH compared with controls (45.3 versus 58.5% and 21.5 versus 105.2%) on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C during C-H-R exposure and on recovery to T(rec) 37 degrees C.The results suggested that l-arginine possesses potent anti-stress activity during C-H-R exposure and recovery from C-H-R-induced hypothermia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
In the present study, oral supplementation of l-arginine in rats was evaluated for its anti-stress and adaptogenic activity using the cold (5 degrees C)-hypoxia (428 mmHg)-restraint (C-H-R) animal model. A dose-dependent study of l-arginine was carried out at doses of 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, 100.0, 200.0 and 500.0 mg/kg body weight, administered orally 30 min prior to C-H-R exposure. The time taken by the rat to attain a rectal temperature of 23 degrees C (T(rec) 23 degrees C) during C-H-R exposure and its recovery to T(rec) 37 degrees C at normal atmospheric pressure and 32 +/- 1 degrees C were used as biomarkers of anti-stress and adaptogenic activity. Biochemical parameters related to lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidants, cell membrane permeability, nitric oxide and stress, with and without administration of the least effective l-arginine dose, were measured in rats on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C and T(rec) 37 degrees C. The least effective adaptogenic dose of l-arginine was 100.0 mg/kg body weight. The C-H-R exposure of control rats, on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C, resulted in a significant increase in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), blood lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a decrease in blood catalase (CAT) and plasma testosterone levels. On recovery (T(rec) 37 degrees C) of control rats, there was a further decrease in CAT and plasma testosterone, and an increase in LDH. l-Arginine supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in plasma MDA, an increase in blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT levels maintained at control values and a lower increase in LDH compared with controls (45.3 versus 58.5% and 21.5 versus 105.2%) on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C during C-H-R exposure and on recovery to T(rec) 37 degrees C. The results suggested that l-arginine possesses potent anti-stress activity during C-H-R exposure and recovery from C-H-R-induced hypothermia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dose-dependent study of l-arginine in rats on time (in minutes) taken to attain Trec 23°C during C-H-R exposure and recovery of rectal temperature to 37°C. ▪ = Trec 20°C □ = Trec 37°C. *Significant in comparison with their respective control values at P < 0.05.
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fig1: Dose-dependent study of l-arginine in rats on time (in minutes) taken to attain Trec 23°C during C-H-R exposure and recovery of rectal temperature to 37°C. ▪ = Trec 20°C □ = Trec 37°C. *Significant in comparison with their respective control values at P < 0.05.

Mentions: The orally administered doses of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight in rats were observed to have no significant effect on the time taken to attain Trec 23°C in comparison with controls. However, l-arginine doses of 100, 200 and 500 mg/kg body weight showed a significant increase in time taken to attain a fall of Trec to 23°C. The time taken by the rats to recover Trec 37°C from C-H-R-induced hypothermia was reduced significantly at all the doses of l-arginine used, except the 500 mg/kg body weight dose in comparison with control rats (Fig. 1). However, the oral administration of l-arginine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight was observed to possess an optimum adaptogenic activity as evidenced by a significant increase (53.5%) in the time taken to attain a fall of Trec to 23°C and significantly faster (39.6%) recovery (Trec 37°C) from C-H-R exposure-induced hypothermia, in comparison with control rats (Fig. 1).


Anti-stress and Adaptogenic Activity of l-Arginine Supplementation.

Gupta V, Gupta A, Saggu S, Divekar HM, Grover SK, Kumar R - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2004)

Dose-dependent study of l-arginine in rats on time (in minutes) taken to attain Trec 23°C during C-H-R exposure and recovery of rectal temperature to 37°C. ▪ = Trec 20°C □ = Trec 37°C. *Significant in comparison with their respective control values at P < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1062147&req=5

fig1: Dose-dependent study of l-arginine in rats on time (in minutes) taken to attain Trec 23°C during C-H-R exposure and recovery of rectal temperature to 37°C. ▪ = Trec 20°C □ = Trec 37°C. *Significant in comparison with their respective control values at P < 0.05.
Mentions: The orally administered doses of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight in rats were observed to have no significant effect on the time taken to attain Trec 23°C in comparison with controls. However, l-arginine doses of 100, 200 and 500 mg/kg body weight showed a significant increase in time taken to attain a fall of Trec to 23°C. The time taken by the rats to recover Trec 37°C from C-H-R-induced hypothermia was reduced significantly at all the doses of l-arginine used, except the 500 mg/kg body weight dose in comparison with control rats (Fig. 1). However, the oral administration of l-arginine at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight was observed to possess an optimum adaptogenic activity as evidenced by a significant increase (53.5%) in the time taken to attain a fall of Trec to 23°C and significantly faster (39.6%) recovery (Trec 37°C) from C-H-R exposure-induced hypothermia, in comparison with control rats (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The least effective adaptogenic dose of l-arginine was 100.0 mg/kg body weight.On recovery (T(rec) 37 degrees C) of control rats, there was a further decrease in CAT and plasma testosterone, and an increase in LDH. l-Arginine supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in plasma MDA, an increase in blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT levels maintained at control values and a lower increase in LDH compared with controls (45.3 versus 58.5% and 21.5 versus 105.2%) on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C during C-H-R exposure and on recovery to T(rec) 37 degrees C.The results suggested that l-arginine possesses potent anti-stress activity during C-H-R exposure and recovery from C-H-R-induced hypothermia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
In the present study, oral supplementation of l-arginine in rats was evaluated for its anti-stress and adaptogenic activity using the cold (5 degrees C)-hypoxia (428 mmHg)-restraint (C-H-R) animal model. A dose-dependent study of l-arginine was carried out at doses of 12.5, 25.0, 50.0, 100.0, 200.0 and 500.0 mg/kg body weight, administered orally 30 min prior to C-H-R exposure. The time taken by the rat to attain a rectal temperature of 23 degrees C (T(rec) 23 degrees C) during C-H-R exposure and its recovery to T(rec) 37 degrees C at normal atmospheric pressure and 32 +/- 1 degrees C were used as biomarkers of anti-stress and adaptogenic activity. Biochemical parameters related to lipid peroxidation, anti-oxidants, cell membrane permeability, nitric oxide and stress, with and without administration of the least effective l-arginine dose, were measured in rats on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C and T(rec) 37 degrees C. The least effective adaptogenic dose of l-arginine was 100.0 mg/kg body weight. The C-H-R exposure of control rats, on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C, resulted in a significant increase in plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), blood lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and a decrease in blood catalase (CAT) and plasma testosterone levels. On recovery (T(rec) 37 degrees C) of control rats, there was a further decrease in CAT and plasma testosterone, and an increase in LDH. l-Arginine supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in plasma MDA, an increase in blood superoxide dismutase (SOD), CAT levels maintained at control values and a lower increase in LDH compared with controls (45.3 versus 58.5% and 21.5 versus 105.2%) on attaining T(rec) 23 degrees C during C-H-R exposure and on recovery to T(rec) 37 degrees C. The results suggested that l-arginine possesses potent anti-stress activity during C-H-R exposure and recovery from C-H-R-induced hypothermia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus