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The families evaluation on management, care and disclosure for terminal stage cancer patients.

Mystakidou K, Parpa E, Tsilika E, Kalaidopoulou O, Vlahos L - BMC Palliat Care (2002)

Bottom Line: Factor analysis was based upon information disclosure, hospitalization, and support-communication demonstrating Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.66, 0.5 and 0.70 respectively.Average item totals and inter-item scale correlations were between 0.62-0.70, with convergent validity correlations between 0.60-0.86.The questionnaire was well accepted by all subjects with an 8-10 minute completion time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pain Relief & Palliative Care Unit, Department of Radiology, Areteion Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Hellas, Greece. mistakidou@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Quality of life is an important concept which is subjective and personal; what is an acceptable quality of life to one may be 'worse than death' to another. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire to assess relatives' perceptions and attitudes towards their terminal stage cancer patients' management (information disclosure, treatment choice, hospitalization and support-communication and care) including aspects regarding end-of-life and quality-of-life decisions. METHODS: The final study consisted of 146 relatives of advanced terminal stage cancer patients receiving palliation, attending a Pain Relief and Palliative Care Unit. The questionnaire incorporated 6 multi-item and 7 single-item scales, and was developed following a systematic review of measures appropriate for use in palliative care settings. RESULTS: Following analysis of the 25-item scale, the questionnaire has been validated as a shortened 21-item scale consisting of 5 multi-item and 5 single-item scales. Factor analysis was based upon information disclosure, hospitalization, and support-communication demonstrating Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.66, 0.5 and 0.70 respectively. Average item totals and inter-item scale correlations were between 0.62-0.70, with convergent validity correlations between 0.60-0.86. The questionnaire was well accepted by all subjects with an 8-10 minute completion time. CONCLUSION: The shortened 21-item self-assessment questionnaire may provide acceptable and valid assessment of caregiver(s)/Greek cancer patients' relatives perceptions on palliative care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

First choices from each factor in "choice of the medical treatment".
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Figure 1: First choices from each factor in "choice of the medical treatment".

Mentions: The results of question number 3 "choice of the medical treatment" are presented in Table 3 (the distribution of factors influencing choice of treatment in a hierarchical order), and the percentage first choice for each of the items is depicted in Figure 1. According to the participants, the first choice on the hierarchy is the factor " expectance of survival" (28%), while only an 18.5% chose the factor of "long term quality of life" as first in the hierarchy. The most common second factor is "expected effectiveness" (28%). The "long-term quality of life", depicts third place (19%), while 18.5% chose the factor of "expected effectiveness". The patients' "short-term quality of life" comes forth in the hierarchy (21%), while the factor of "possible complications and side effects" comes fifth (20.5%). The latter, also occupies the sixth place in the hierarchical ranking (23%). As the most common lowest ranked factor was, "consequences in the patients' sexuality" (63%).


The families evaluation on management, care and disclosure for terminal stage cancer patients.

Mystakidou K, Parpa E, Tsilika E, Kalaidopoulou O, Vlahos L - BMC Palliat Care (2002)

First choices from each factor in "choice of the medical treatment".
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC102762&req=5

Figure 1: First choices from each factor in "choice of the medical treatment".
Mentions: The results of question number 3 "choice of the medical treatment" are presented in Table 3 (the distribution of factors influencing choice of treatment in a hierarchical order), and the percentage first choice for each of the items is depicted in Figure 1. According to the participants, the first choice on the hierarchy is the factor " expectance of survival" (28%), while only an 18.5% chose the factor of "long term quality of life" as first in the hierarchy. The most common second factor is "expected effectiveness" (28%). The "long-term quality of life", depicts third place (19%), while 18.5% chose the factor of "expected effectiveness". The patients' "short-term quality of life" comes forth in the hierarchy (21%), while the factor of "possible complications and side effects" comes fifth (20.5%). The latter, also occupies the sixth place in the hierarchical ranking (23%). As the most common lowest ranked factor was, "consequences in the patients' sexuality" (63%).

Bottom Line: Factor analysis was based upon information disclosure, hospitalization, and support-communication demonstrating Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.66, 0.5 and 0.70 respectively.Average item totals and inter-item scale correlations were between 0.62-0.70, with convergent validity correlations between 0.60-0.86.The questionnaire was well accepted by all subjects with an 8-10 minute completion time.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pain Relief & Palliative Care Unit, Department of Radiology, Areteion Hospital, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Hellas, Greece. mistakidou@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Quality of life is an important concept which is subjective and personal; what is an acceptable quality of life to one may be 'worse than death' to another. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire to assess relatives' perceptions and attitudes towards their terminal stage cancer patients' management (information disclosure, treatment choice, hospitalization and support-communication and care) including aspects regarding end-of-life and quality-of-life decisions. METHODS: The final study consisted of 146 relatives of advanced terminal stage cancer patients receiving palliation, attending a Pain Relief and Palliative Care Unit. The questionnaire incorporated 6 multi-item and 7 single-item scales, and was developed following a systematic review of measures appropriate for use in palliative care settings. RESULTS: Following analysis of the 25-item scale, the questionnaire has been validated as a shortened 21-item scale consisting of 5 multi-item and 5 single-item scales. Factor analysis was based upon information disclosure, hospitalization, and support-communication demonstrating Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.66, 0.5 and 0.70 respectively. Average item totals and inter-item scale correlations were between 0.62-0.70, with convergent validity correlations between 0.60-0.86. The questionnaire was well accepted by all subjects with an 8-10 minute completion time. CONCLUSION: The shortened 21-item self-assessment questionnaire may provide acceptable and valid assessment of caregiver(s)/Greek cancer patients' relatives perceptions on palliative care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus