Limits...
Pneumonia

USU Teaching File MUTF - MedPix (2000)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Chest radiography is the main tool for diagnosing and defining the extent of pneumonia. In pneumonia, there are typically isolated areas consolidation within the lung fields, however the onset of symptoms may precede the presence of any radiologic findings. The radiographic abnormality may persist for up to 6 months after the resolution of symptoms. There are characteristic radiologic findings associated with the particular areas of lung involvement. Obscuration of the left and right hemidiaphragm are associated with infiltrates in the left and right lower lobes respectively. Obscuration of the left and right heart borders are characteristic of infiltrates in the lingula and right middle lobes respectively. The presence of a pulmonary infiltrate does not diagnose a pneumonia, even when found in association with chest pain and fever. Other things that can mimic this include atelectasis, neoplasm, pulmonary embolism, and infarction. Streptococcus pneumonia is classically associated with acute onset shaking chills, fevers, and pleuritic chest pain. In addition the associated cough is classically productive of rusty sputum. The risk of Streptococcal pneumonia is greater in patients with chronic medical problems. There are no characteristic radiologic findings that are diagnostic of Streptococcal pneumonia versus other microbes, but some generalizations can be made. First, symptoms typically precede findings by 1-2 days. Secondly, this specific bacteria more often affects one or both of the lower lobes rather than the upper or middle portions of the lungs.

No MeSH data available.


© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2787&req=5


Pneumonia

USU Teaching File MUTF - MedPix (2000)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2787&req=5

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Chest radiography is the main tool for diagnosing and defining the extent of pneumonia. In pneumonia, there are typically isolated areas consolidation within the lung fields, however the onset of symptoms may precede the presence of any radiologic findings. The radiographic abnormality may persist for up to 6 months after the resolution of symptoms. There are characteristic radiologic findings associated with the particular areas of lung involvement. Obscuration of the left and right hemidiaphragm are associated with infiltrates in the left and right lower lobes respectively. Obscuration of the left and right heart borders are characteristic of infiltrates in the lingula and right middle lobes respectively. The presence of a pulmonary infiltrate does not diagnose a pneumonia, even when found in association with chest pain and fever. Other things that can mimic this include atelectasis, neoplasm, pulmonary embolism, and infarction. Streptococcus pneumonia is classically associated with acute onset shaking chills, fevers, and pleuritic chest pain. In addition the associated cough is classically productive of rusty sputum. The risk of Streptococcal pneumonia is greater in patients with chronic medical problems. There are no characteristic radiologic findings that are diagnostic of Streptococcal pneumonia versus other microbes, but some generalizations can be made. First, symptoms typically precede findings by 1-2 days. Secondly, this specific bacteria more often affects one or both of the lower lobes rather than the upper or middle portions of the lungs.

No MeSH data available.