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Ultrasound Imaging of Acute Appendicitis

Uyesugi WYU - MedPix (2001)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Tripler Army Medical Center

ABSTRACT

Acute appendicitis constitutes the most common abdominal surgical emergency, affecting approximately 1 in 14 americans at some point in theirs lives, and 0.1% of the US population per year. Approximately 250,000 appendectomies are performed each year, of which approximately 20% disclose a normal appendix. Ultrasound has recently received considerable attention as a means of diagnosing appendicitis. In skilled hands, it has a sensitivity over 90% and an even higher specificity. The examination is performed by gradually pressing the transducer down on the skin of the right lower quadrant, thereby displacing gas filled bowel loops and minimizing the distance between the transducer and the appendix. The diagnosis is made when the diseased appendix is identified as a tubular, noncompressible structure measuring 6mm or more in diameter and demonstrating no peristalsis. Confidence is further increased when a appendicolith, an echogenic focus with posterior shadowing seen in approximately one-third of patients, is identified. Difficulties with the ultrasongraphic approach include a retrocecal appendix and obese or uncooperative patients. Moreover, the examination is highly operator dependent.

No MeSH data available.


Acute appendicitis
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License
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MPX2766_synpic745: Acute appendicitis


Ultrasound Imaging of Acute Appendicitis

Uyesugi WYU - MedPix (2001)

Acute appendicitis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2766&req=5

MPX2766_synpic745: Acute appendicitis

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Tripler Army Medical Center

ABSTRACT

Acute appendicitis constitutes the most common abdominal surgical emergency, affecting approximately 1 in 14 americans at some point in theirs lives, and 0.1% of the US population per year. Approximately 250,000 appendectomies are performed each year, of which approximately 20% disclose a normal appendix. Ultrasound has recently received considerable attention as a means of diagnosing appendicitis. In skilled hands, it has a sensitivity over 90% and an even higher specificity. The examination is performed by gradually pressing the transducer down on the skin of the right lower quadrant, thereby displacing gas filled bowel loops and minimizing the distance between the transducer and the appendix. The diagnosis is made when the diseased appendix is identified as a tubular, noncompressible structure measuring 6mm or more in diameter and demonstrating no peristalsis. Confidence is further increased when a appendicolith, an echogenic focus with posterior shadowing seen in approximately one-third of patients, is identified. Difficulties with the ultrasongraphic approach include a retrocecal appendix and obese or uncooperative patients. Moreover, the examination is highly operator dependent.

No MeSH data available.