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Crohn's Disease

Burris ACB - MedPix (2001)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Tripler Army Medical Center

ABSTRACT

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are identified as inflammatory bowel disease. The onset Crohn’s disease is insidious, and can occur throughout life. However, the a mean age of onset between 15 and 35. The etiology involves the activation of immune cells by inciting agents which are unknown. There is also believed to be a genetic component. Acute flares may be initiated by stress, infection, or the use of NSAIDS. Patients with Crohn’s disease can present with fever, abdominal pain, anorectal fissures, fistulas, abcesses, or diarrhea which, in contrast to ulcerative colitis, is usually not bloody. Crohn’s is a transmural process with an asymmetric, patchy distribution which can manifest anywhere along the GI tract. The most common location is the area of the terminal ileum and cecum. Grossly, there will be areas of healthy mucosa between inflamed bowel which is known as "skipping." The ulcers associated with Crohn’s are deep and form clefts or long tracks between protruding edematous and inflamed mucosa giving the classic "cobblestone" appearance. In contrast to Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis most often involves the rectum and sigmoid colon. The disease is typically limited to the mucosa and submucosa, and is a continuous area of inflammation without skip lesions. UC has a higher risk for developing carcinoma as well as sclerosing cholangitis. Complications of Crohn’s include, a slight increased risk for carcinoma, fistula formation, perforation, dirverticulosis, and bile salt malabsorption leading to cholesterol gallstones and/or oxalate kidney stones. There are also extraintestinal manifestations some of which include arthritis, sacroiliitis, erythema nodosum, apthous ulcers, pyoderma gangrenosum, iritis, or uveitis. Treatment can include glucocorticoids for severe CD, azathioprine, metronidazole, and resective surgery for fixed obstructions, fistulas, or abscesses.

No MeSH data available.


Axial CT image displaying inflammation of distal ilium, with fistula to psoas muscle creating a psoas abscess.  There is also a fistula to the abdominal surface.
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MPX2754_synpic1180: Axial CT image displaying inflammation of distal ilium, with fistula to psoas muscle creating a psoas abscess. There is also a fistula to the abdominal surface.


Crohn's Disease

Burris ACB - MedPix (2001)

Axial CT image displaying inflammation of distal ilium, with fistula to psoas muscle creating a psoas abscess.  There is also a fistula to the abdominal surface.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2754&req=5

MPX2754_synpic1180: Axial CT image displaying inflammation of distal ilium, with fistula to psoas muscle creating a psoas abscess. There is also a fistula to the abdominal surface.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Tripler Army Medical Center

ABSTRACT

Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are identified as inflammatory bowel disease. The onset Crohn’s disease is insidious, and can occur throughout life. However, the a mean age of onset between 15 and 35. The etiology involves the activation of immune cells by inciting agents which are unknown. There is also believed to be a genetic component. Acute flares may be initiated by stress, infection, or the use of NSAIDS. Patients with Crohn’s disease can present with fever, abdominal pain, anorectal fissures, fistulas, abcesses, or diarrhea which, in contrast to ulcerative colitis, is usually not bloody. Crohn’s is a transmural process with an asymmetric, patchy distribution which can manifest anywhere along the GI tract. The most common location is the area of the terminal ileum and cecum. Grossly, there will be areas of healthy mucosa between inflamed bowel which is known as "skipping." The ulcers associated with Crohn’s are deep and form clefts or long tracks between protruding edematous and inflamed mucosa giving the classic "cobblestone" appearance. In contrast to Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis most often involves the rectum and sigmoid colon. The disease is typically limited to the mucosa and submucosa, and is a continuous area of inflammation without skip lesions. UC has a higher risk for developing carcinoma as well as sclerosing cholangitis. Complications of Crohn’s include, a slight increased risk for carcinoma, fistula formation, perforation, dirverticulosis, and bile salt malabsorption leading to cholesterol gallstones and/or oxalate kidney stones. There are also extraintestinal manifestations some of which include arthritis, sacroiliitis, erythema nodosum, apthous ulcers, pyoderma gangrenosum, iritis, or uveitis. Treatment can include glucocorticoids for severe CD, azathioprine, metronidazole, and resective surgery for fixed obstructions, fistulas, or abscesses.

No MeSH data available.