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Craniosynostosis

Biega TJB - MedPix (2001)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Craniosynostosis is the result of premature closure of the calvarial sutures and can be primary or secondary in nature. Secondary causes of craniosynostosis include metabolic diseases, prematurity, external skull compression or decreased intracranial pressure. The cause of primary craniosynostosis is unknown. Clinically significant synostoses are thought to have developed in utero and are typically detectable at or shortly after time of birth. If only one cranial suture is closed, there is typically no need for intervention as bony remodeling is able to maintain normal skull shape after one year of age. Males are more commonly affected than females (3:1 ratio). Sagittal synostosis is most common (56%) followed by multiple (14%), unilateral coronal (11%), (bilateral coronal (11%), metopic (7%) and lambdoid (1%). Single craniosynostosis does not result in impairment of brain growth, so surgery is only needed for cosmetic purposes. In cases of multiple craniosynostoses, increased intracranial pressure can occur and early craniectomy is necessary. Metopic synostosis, as seen above, results in trigonocephaly, with a pointed forehead and sclerosis of the metopic suture. The orbits may be angled medial and upward to produce "the quizzical eye" appearance.

No MeSH data available.


A single axial image demonstrates trigonocephaly with pointing of the forehead and parasutural sclerosis.
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MPX2735_synpic1490: A single axial image demonstrates trigonocephaly with pointing of the forehead and parasutural sclerosis.


Craniosynostosis

Biega TJB - MedPix (2001)

A single axial image demonstrates trigonocephaly with pointing of the forehead and parasutural sclerosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2735&req=5

MPX2735_synpic1490: A single axial image demonstrates trigonocephaly with pointing of the forehead and parasutural sclerosis.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Craniosynostosis is the result of premature closure of the calvarial sutures and can be primary or secondary in nature. Secondary causes of craniosynostosis include metabolic diseases, prematurity, external skull compression or decreased intracranial pressure. The cause of primary craniosynostosis is unknown. Clinically significant synostoses are thought to have developed in utero and are typically detectable at or shortly after time of birth. If only one cranial suture is closed, there is typically no need for intervention as bony remodeling is able to maintain normal skull shape after one year of age. Males are more commonly affected than females (3:1 ratio). Sagittal synostosis is most common (56%) followed by multiple (14%), unilateral coronal (11%), (bilateral coronal (11%), metopic (7%) and lambdoid (1%). Single craniosynostosis does not result in impairment of brain growth, so surgery is only needed for cosmetic purposes. In cases of multiple craniosynostoses, increased intracranial pressure can occur and early craniectomy is necessary. Metopic synostosis, as seen above, results in trigonocephaly, with a pointed forehead and sclerosis of the metopic suture. The orbits may be angled medial and upward to produce "the quizzical eye" appearance.

No MeSH data available.