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Developmental venous anomaly (Venous Angioma)

Smirniotopoulos, M.D. JGSM - MedPix (2001)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Venous angiomas are the third type of vascular malformation. These may be isolated anomalies, but have reported in association with cavernous malformations. (Some authors have reported that the cavernous hemangioma may be a secondary lesion produced by the venous varix.) The venous angioma is a post-capillary malformation. The classic description of the venous angioma or varix includes a crown of multiple small venules that converge on a larger venous trunk. The venous trunk usually drains into a dural sinus. One theory suggests that the primary problem is a lack of "bridging veins" connecting the cortex to the dural sinuses. Any vein that does make the connection to the dural sinus (the so-called "transcortical vein") will now drain an unusually large volume of brain, and therefore enlarges. The "crown" of veins that converge onto the connecting trunk are "collecting veins" that drain the capillaries from the affected volume. Because a large volume of brain, and a corresponding large volume of blood drain into a single vessel, the venous pressure within the varix can be elevated. This elevated pressure may help produce the secondary cavernous hemangiomas. Hemorrhage from a varix is unusual, and many cases are either incidental findings, or present in association with a cavernous hemangioma. On CT, the varix is a tubular structure, often oriented to point toward the cortical surface and to the nearest dural sinus. The varix has the attenuation of blood and enhances after contrast infusion. On MR imaging, there is usually a tubular flow-void in the varix on routine spin-echo sequences. Angiographically, the varix has been described as a "medusa head". It really looks more like a hydra or a palm tree - the dominant transcortical vein is the trunk; and the radiating crown of feeding veins are the leaves.

No MeSH data available.


AP Angiogram. ICA injection, venous phase.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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MPX2674_synpic958: AP Angiogram. ICA injection, venous phase.


Developmental venous anomaly (Venous Angioma)

Smirniotopoulos, M.D. JGSM - MedPix (2001)

AP Angiogram. ICA injection, venous phase.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2674&req=5

MPX2674_synpic958: AP Angiogram. ICA injection, venous phase.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Venous angiomas are the third type of vascular malformation. These may be isolated anomalies, but have reported in association with cavernous malformations. (Some authors have reported that the cavernous hemangioma may be a secondary lesion produced by the venous varix.) The venous angioma is a post-capillary malformation. The classic description of the venous angioma or varix includes a crown of multiple small venules that converge on a larger venous trunk. The venous trunk usually drains into a dural sinus. One theory suggests that the primary problem is a lack of "bridging veins" connecting the cortex to the dural sinuses. Any vein that does make the connection to the dural sinus (the so-called "transcortical vein") will now drain an unusually large volume of brain, and therefore enlarges. The "crown" of veins that converge onto the connecting trunk are "collecting veins" that drain the capillaries from the affected volume. Because a large volume of brain, and a corresponding large volume of blood drain into a single vessel, the venous pressure within the varix can be elevated. This elevated pressure may help produce the secondary cavernous hemangiomas. Hemorrhage from a varix is unusual, and many cases are either incidental findings, or present in association with a cavernous hemangioma. On CT, the varix is a tubular structure, often oriented to point toward the cortical surface and to the nearest dural sinus. The varix has the attenuation of blood and enhances after contrast infusion. On MR imaging, there is usually a tubular flow-void in the varix on routine spin-echo sequences. Angiographically, the varix has been described as a "medusa head". It really looks more like a hydra or a palm tree - the dominant transcortical vein is the trunk; and the radiating crown of feeding veins are the leaves.

No MeSH data available.