Limits...
Button Sequestrum

USU Teaching File MUTF - MedPix (2000)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

A Button Sequestrum refers to a lytic lesion with an intact central nidus of dense bone. It can have several etiologies, including: 1) Eosinophilic granuloma: This frequently begins in the diploe and destroys both tables of the skull. Asymmetrical involvement of the two tables results in the bevelled appearance of the margins of the lesion. Incomplete destruction of either table may be the cause of the sequestrum?like appearance. 2) Tuberculous osteitis: This is a frequent sequel of hematogenous dissemination of tuberculosis. Although the extremities are the favored sites, involvement of the spine, skull, and ribs is also encountered. Sequestra in tuberculous skull lesions have occasionally been noted. 3) Metastatic carcinoma. 4) Necrosis following radiotherapy.

No MeSH data available.


Small,doughnut-shaped lesion in the parietal region of the skull.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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MPX2656_synpic505: Small,doughnut-shaped lesion in the parietal region of the skull.


Button Sequestrum

USU Teaching File MUTF - MedPix (2000)

Small,doughnut-shaped lesion in the parietal region of the skull.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2656&req=5

MPX2656_synpic505: Small,doughnut-shaped lesion in the parietal region of the skull.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

A Button Sequestrum refers to a lytic lesion with an intact central nidus of dense bone. It can have several etiologies, including: 1) Eosinophilic granuloma: This frequently begins in the diploe and destroys both tables of the skull. Asymmetrical involvement of the two tables results in the bevelled appearance of the margins of the lesion. Incomplete destruction of either table may be the cause of the sequestrum?like appearance. 2) Tuberculous osteitis: This is a frequent sequel of hematogenous dissemination of tuberculosis. Although the extremities are the favored sites, involvement of the spine, skull, and ribs is also encountered. Sequestra in tuberculous skull lesions have occasionally been noted. 3) Metastatic carcinoma. 4) Necrosis following radiotherapy.

No MeSH data available.