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Synovial osteochondromatosis

Nguyen DKN - MedPix (2001)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Madigan Army Medical Center

ABSTRACT

It is generally believed that primary synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is caused by hyperplastic chondrometaplasia of the synovium with subsequent endochondral bone formation and formation of calcified loose bodies within the joint space. Three phases of primary SOC are described. Synovial metaplasia without loose bodies, metaplasia with development of loose bodies, and an inactive phase, with loose bodies but without synovial metaplasia. The etiology of SOC remains unkown. Secondary synovial osteochondromatosis is the same type of intrasynovial proliferative disease, but in joints already affected by some form of arthritis. Patients with SOC usually present with chronic pain, stiffness, swelling and limitation of motion. The radiological diagnosis of SOC is based on the demonstration of cartilaginous loose bodies of variable number that are enclosed by a thickened synovial joint capsule. Subsequently, these nodules may calcify and ossify to a variable extent. In long standing disease, cortical scalloping and bony erosions may develop secondary to pressure changes.

No MeSH data available.


The lateral radiograph reveals both multiple calcified loose bodies throughout the joint cavity and osteoarthritis.
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MPX2627_synpic1027: The lateral radiograph reveals both multiple calcified loose bodies throughout the joint cavity and osteoarthritis.


Synovial osteochondromatosis

Nguyen DKN - MedPix (2001)

The lateral radiograph reveals both multiple calcified loose bodies throughout the joint cavity and osteoarthritis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2627&req=5

MPX2627_synpic1027: The lateral radiograph reveals both multiple calcified loose bodies throughout the joint cavity and osteoarthritis.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Topic

Affiliation: Madigan Army Medical Center

ABSTRACT

It is generally believed that primary synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is caused by hyperplastic chondrometaplasia of the synovium with subsequent endochondral bone formation and formation of calcified loose bodies within the joint space. Three phases of primary SOC are described. Synovial metaplasia without loose bodies, metaplasia with development of loose bodies, and an inactive phase, with loose bodies but without synovial metaplasia. The etiology of SOC remains unkown. Secondary synovial osteochondromatosis is the same type of intrasynovial proliferative disease, but in joints already affected by some form of arthritis. Patients with SOC usually present with chronic pain, stiffness, swelling and limitation of motion. The radiological diagnosis of SOC is based on the demonstration of cartilaginous loose bodies of variable number that are enclosed by a thickened synovial joint capsule. Subsequently, these nodules may calcify and ossify to a variable extent. In long standing disease, cortical scalloping and bony erosions may develop secondary to pressure changes.

No MeSH data available.