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Anterior Cruciate Ligament Disruption

Jones BJ - MedPix (2006)

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Case

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Diagnosis: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Disruption

History: The patient was a 21-year man, who twisted his knee while playing in a softball game. Following the injury, he complained of difficulty running, pain in the posterolateral aspect of the knee and joint swelling.

Findings: Lateral radiograph of the knee demonstrates a deep, irregular appearing lateral femoral sulcus, and a small joint effusion, but is otherwise normal (Fig 1). Follow up MR imaging demonstrates marrow edema in the lateral femoral condyle and in the posterior tibial plateau. The lateral femoral sulcus appears deepened and irregular in contour. T2-weighted sagittal image through the region of the intercondylar notch demonstrates complete disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament (Fig 2).

Ddx: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Disruption

Dxhow: Follow up MRI confirmed the complete disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament.

Exam: Initial physical examination of the knee revealed a small joint effusion, but no deformity. The knee demonstrated full range of motion and there was no documentation of instability.

No MeSH data available.


This figure demonstrates how to measure the lateral condylopatellar sulcus to see if it is less than 2 mm. The depth of the notch is measured by drawing a line tangential to the sulcus along the articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle and then by measuring the distance from the line to the depth of the sulcus.  When this measurement is greater than 2 mm it is referred to as the “deep lateral femoral sulcus” sign.
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MPX2300_synpic31038: This figure demonstrates how to measure the lateral condylopatellar sulcus to see if it is less than 2 mm. The depth of the notch is measured by drawing a line tangential to the sulcus along the articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle and then by measuring the distance from the line to the depth of the sulcus. When this measurement is greater than 2 mm it is referred to as the “deep lateral femoral sulcus” sign.


Anterior Cruciate Ligament Disruption

Jones BJ - MedPix (2006)

This figure demonstrates how to measure the lateral condylopatellar sulcus to see if it is less than 2 mm. The depth of the notch is measured by drawing a line tangential to the sulcus along the articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle and then by measuring the distance from the line to the depth of the sulcus.  When this measurement is greater than 2 mm it is referred to as the “deep lateral femoral sulcus” sign.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX2300&req=5

MPX2300_synpic31038: This figure demonstrates how to measure the lateral condylopatellar sulcus to see if it is less than 2 mm. The depth of the notch is measured by drawing a line tangential to the sulcus along the articular surface of the lateral femoral condyle and then by measuring the distance from the line to the depth of the sulcus. When this measurement is greater than 2 mm it is referred to as the “deep lateral femoral sulcus” sign.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Case

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Diagnosis: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Disruption

History: The patient was a 21-year man, who twisted his knee while playing in a softball game. Following the injury, he complained of difficulty running, pain in the posterolateral aspect of the knee and joint swelling.

Findings: Lateral radiograph of the knee demonstrates a deep, irregular appearing lateral femoral sulcus, and a small joint effusion, but is otherwise normal (Fig 1). Follow up MR imaging demonstrates marrow edema in the lateral femoral condyle and in the posterior tibial plateau. The lateral femoral sulcus appears deepened and irregular in contour. T2-weighted sagittal image through the region of the intercondylar notch demonstrates complete disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament (Fig 2).

Ddx: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Disruption

Dxhow: Follow up MRI confirmed the complete disruption of the anterior cruciate ligament.

Exam: Initial physical examination of the knee revealed a small joint effusion, but no deformity. The knee demonstrated full range of motion and there was no documentation of instability.

No MeSH data available.