Limits...
Swimming-Induced Pulmonary Edema (SIPE)

USU Teaching File MUTF - MedPix

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Case

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Diagnosis: Swimming-Induced Pulmonary Edema (SIPE)

History: A healthy twenty year old United States Navy search and rescue swimmer, equipped with only mask and fins performed a breath-hold dive to twelve feet. He developed sharp substernal chest pain, and shortness of breath. He immediately surfaced and began to cough up pink, frothy sputum and have persistent shortness of breath. His initial oxygen saturation was 70 percent on room air and improved to 86 percent on three liters of oxygen via nasal cannula during ambulance transfer. Upon arrival to the emergency room the patient had an oxygen saturation of 100 percent on three liters of oxygen with improved shortness of breath and resolved hemoptysis. The patient denied aspiration. The patient also denied any history of asthma, dyspnea on exertion, or similar episodes.

Findings: Venous congestion with partial reolution on follow-up chest film done 3 hours later.

Ddx: <li>pulmonary edema <li>aspiration pneumonia <li>fresh water drowning <li>fluid overload

Exam: The patient had normal vital signs. Auscultation of the lungs revealed bilateral rhonchi. Examination of the heart revealed a regular rhythm, normal S1 and S2 with no murmurs, rubs, or gallops. The remainder of the physical exam was unremarkable. Electrocardiogram, complete blood count, electrolytes, creatine kinase, troponin, and coagulation studies were all within normal limits.

No MeSH data available.


Partial resolution on follow-up chest film done 1 hour and 53 minutes later.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX1940&req=5

MPX1940_synpic17095: Partial resolution on follow-up chest film done 1 hour and 53 minutes later.


Swimming-Induced Pulmonary Edema (SIPE)

USU Teaching File MUTF - MedPix

Partial resolution on follow-up chest film done 1 hour and 53 minutes later.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=MPX1940&req=5

MPX1940_synpic17095: Partial resolution on follow-up chest film done 1 hour and 53 minutes later.

View Article: MedPix Image - MedPix Case

Affiliation: Uniformed Services University

ABSTRACT

Diagnosis: Swimming-Induced Pulmonary Edema (SIPE)

History: A healthy twenty year old United States Navy search and rescue swimmer, equipped with only mask and fins performed a breath-hold dive to twelve feet. He developed sharp substernal chest pain, and shortness of breath. He immediately surfaced and began to cough up pink, frothy sputum and have persistent shortness of breath. His initial oxygen saturation was 70 percent on room air and improved to 86 percent on three liters of oxygen via nasal cannula during ambulance transfer. Upon arrival to the emergency room the patient had an oxygen saturation of 100 percent on three liters of oxygen with improved shortness of breath and resolved hemoptysis. The patient denied aspiration. The patient also denied any history of asthma, dyspnea on exertion, or similar episodes.

Findings: Venous congestion with partial reolution on follow-up chest film done 3 hours later.

Ddx: <li>pulmonary edema <li>aspiration pneumonia <li>fresh water drowning <li>fluid overload

Exam: The patient had normal vital signs. Auscultation of the lungs revealed bilateral rhonchi. Examination of the heart revealed a regular rhythm, normal S1 and S2 with no murmurs, rubs, or gallops. The remainder of the physical exam was unremarkable. Electrocardiogram, complete blood count, electrolytes, creatine kinase, troponin, and coagulation studies were all within normal limits.

No MeSH data available.