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[Conquerors of pain]

Detroit : Parke, Davis & Company, 1961?

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION / EXTENT: 1 print : color ; 25 x 32 cm

ABSTRACT

Reproduction of an oil painting (created betweem 1945 and 1979) by Robert Thom. "Before a skeptical group of surgeons in the operating amphitheater of Massachusetts General Hospital, October 16, 1846, William T.G. Morton, Boston Dentist, prepared to anesthetize Dr. John C. Warren's surgical patient, Gilbert Abbott, by causing him to enhale ether. Though Crawford W. Long, Georgia Physician, had used ether for anesthesia in 1842, and Horace Wells, Connecticut Dentist, tried unsuccessfully to demonstrate anesthesia with nitrous oxide in 1845, reports of painless operations resulting from Morton's methods gave practical anesthesia to mankind. Within a year ether was being used world-widely to conquer pain incident to surgical procedures." -- University of Michigan Museum of Art: Conquerors of pain.

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<p>Reproduction of an oil painting (created betweem 1945 and 1979) by Robert Thom. "Before a skeptical group of surgeons in the operating amphitheater of Massachusetts General Hospital, October 16, 1846, William T.G. Morton, Boston Dentist, prepared to anesthetize Dr. John C. Warren's surgical patient, Gilbert Abbott, by causing him to enhale ether.  Though Crawford W. Long, Georgia Physician, had used ether for anesthesia in 1842, and Horace Wells, Connecticut Dentist, tried unsuccessfully to demonstrate anesthesia with nitrous oxide in 1845, reports of painless operations resulting from Morton's methods gave practical anesthesia to mankind. Within a year ether was being used world-widely to conquer pain incident to surgical procedures." -- University of Michigan Museum of Art: Conquerors of pain.</p>
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Copyright Holder: Pfizer Research date: 06/23/2015 Source: Research.


[Conquerors of pain]

Detroit : Parke, Davis & Company, 1961?

<p>Reproduction of an oil painting (created betweem 1945 and 1979) by Robert Thom. "Before a skeptical group of surgeons in the operating amphitheater of Massachusetts General Hospital, October 16, 1846, William T.G. Morton, Boston Dentist, prepared to anesthetize Dr. John C. Warren's surgical patient, Gilbert Abbott, by causing him to enhale ether.  Though Crawford W. Long, Georgia Physician, had used ether for anesthesia in 1842, and Horace Wells, Connecticut Dentist, tried unsuccessfully to demonstrate anesthesia with nitrous oxide in 1845, reports of painless operations resulting from Morton's methods gave practical anesthesia to mankind. Within a year ether was being used world-widely to conquer pain incident to surgical procedures." -- University of Michigan Museum of Art: Conquerors of pain.</p>
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=HMD101651395&req=5

Order Number: C06362

Copyright: This item may be under copyright protection. Please ask copyright owner for permission before publishing.

View Article: - Source record at Images from the History of Medicine (NLM)

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION / EXTENT: 1 print : color ; 25 x 32 cm

ABSTRACT

Reproduction of an oil painting (created betweem 1945 and 1979) by Robert Thom. "Before a skeptical group of surgeons in the operating amphitheater of Massachusetts General Hospital, October 16, 1846, William T.G. Morton, Boston Dentist, prepared to anesthetize Dr. John C. Warren's surgical patient, Gilbert Abbott, by causing him to enhale ether. Though Crawford W. Long, Georgia Physician, had used ether for anesthesia in 1842, and Horace Wells, Connecticut Dentist, tried unsuccessfully to demonstrate anesthesia with nitrous oxide in 1845, reports of painless operations resulting from Morton's methods gave practical anesthesia to mankind. Within a year ether was being used world-widely to conquer pain incident to surgical procedures." -- University of Michigan Museum of Art: Conquerors of pain.

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