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[Photograph of two men operating X-ray equipment]

Morton, William J. (William James), 1846-1920. X ray or photography of the invisible and its value in surgery - Bethesda, MD : U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Health & Human Services, 2010

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION / EXTENT: 1 online resource (1 image)

ABSTRACT

The apparatus in early X-ray photography: a huge induction coil [on the table against the wall] provides high voltage to drive the rays in a partially evacuated gas tube; behind it, in the back corner, a motor-operated interrupter repeatedly breaks the direct current supply to create magnetic-field changes for induction. The large flat disk in front of the table is the power control, made of an adjustible resistor. A rack on the wall holds spare gas tubes. The complicated interactions between the electrical characteristics of the tube, its gas pressure, and the properties of the rays it emitted were not well understood. Much of the operator's expertise lay in knowing his tubes by heart and choosing the right one for the task. The X-Ray, fig. 54.

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<p>The apparatus in early X-ray photography: a huge induction coil [on the table against the wall] provides high voltage to drive the rays in a partially evacuated gas tube; behind it, in the back corner, a motor-operated interrupter repeatedly breaks the direct current supply to create magnetic-field changes for induction. The large flat disk in front of the table is the power control, made of an adjustible resistor. A rack on the wall holds spare gas tubes. The complicated interactions between the electrical characteristics of the tube, its gas pressure, and the properties of the rays it emitted were not well understood. Much of the operator's expertise lay in knowing his tubes by heart and choosing the right one for the task. The X-Ray, fig. 54.</p>
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[Photograph of two men operating X-ray equipment]

Morton, William J. (William James), 1846-1920. X ray or photography of the invisible and its value in surgery - Bethesda, MD : U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Health & Human Services, 2010

<p>The apparatus in early X-ray photography: a huge induction coil [on the table against the wall] provides high voltage to drive the rays in a partially evacuated gas tube; behind it, in the back corner, a motor-operated interrupter repeatedly breaks the direct current supply to create magnetic-field changes for induction. The large flat disk in front of the table is the power control, made of an adjustible resistor. A rack on the wall holds spare gas tubes. The complicated interactions between the electrical characteristics of the tube, its gas pressure, and the properties of the rays it emitted were not well understood. Much of the operator's expertise lay in knowing his tubes by heart and choosing the right one for the task. The X-Ray, fig. 54.</p>
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=HMD101598100&req=5

Order Number: A033140

Copyright: This item may be under copyright protection. Please ask copyright owner for permission before publishing.

View Article: - Source record at Images from the History of Medicine (NLM)

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION / EXTENT: 1 online resource (1 image)

ABSTRACT

The apparatus in early X-ray photography: a huge induction coil [on the table against the wall] provides high voltage to drive the rays in a partially evacuated gas tube; behind it, in the back corner, a motor-operated interrupter repeatedly breaks the direct current supply to create magnetic-field changes for induction. The large flat disk in front of the table is the power control, made of an adjustible resistor. A rack on the wall holds spare gas tubes. The complicated interactions between the electrical characteristics of the tube, its gas pressure, and the properties of the rays it emitted were not well understood. Much of the operator's expertise lay in knowing his tubes by heart and choosing the right one for the task. The X-Ray, fig. 54.

Show MeSH