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Indiana University Chest X-ray Collection

Kohli MD, Rosenman M - (2013)

Affiliation: Indiana University

ABSTRACT

Comparison: XXXX, XXXX

Indication: Hypoxemia

Findings: Again, the patient is mildly rotated, and there is a mild XXXX curvature of the thoracic spine. Stable borderline cardiac enlargement. In the left lower lobe on the lateral view, there appears to be some patchy airspace disease which is probably mostly atelectasis from an elevated left diaphragm. The be difficult to completely exclude a superimposed pneumonia. No significant pleural effusion or pneumothorax. There is an extensive fusion of the posterior cervical spine.

Impression: Underinflated lungs with elevation of the left diaphragm and patchy airspace disease in the left base, probably mostly atelectasis. It would be difficult to completely exclude a superimposed pneumonia. No pleural effusion.

NOTE: The data are drawn from multiple hospital systems.

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Xray Chest PA and Lateral
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Figure 2: Xray Chest PA and Lateral


Indiana University Chest X-ray Collection

Kohli MD, Rosenman M - (2013)

Xray Chest PA and Lateral
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=CXR2414&req=5

Figure 2: Xray Chest PA and Lateral

Affiliation: Indiana University

ABSTRACT

Comparison: XXXX, XXXX

Indication: Hypoxemia

Findings: Again, the patient is mildly rotated, and there is a mild XXXX curvature of the thoracic spine. Stable borderline cardiac enlargement. In the left lower lobe on the lateral view, there appears to be some patchy airspace disease which is probably mostly atelectasis from an elevated left diaphragm. The be difficult to completely exclude a superimposed pneumonia. No significant pleural effusion or pneumothorax. There is an extensive fusion of the posterior cervical spine.

Impression: Underinflated lungs with elevation of the left diaphragm and patchy airspace disease in the left base, probably mostly atelectasis. It would be difficult to completely exclude a superimposed pneumonia. No pleural effusion.

NOTE: The data are drawn from multiple hospital systems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus Request Collection