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An anetodermic lesion on lateral aspect of left lower leg (before cryotherapy)
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Figure 3: An anetodermic lesion on lateral aspect of left lower leg (before cryotherapy)

Mentions: On clinical examination, the otherwise healthy looking patient's general appearance and mental state had lumbar lordosis, laxity in large joints, tibia vara, high-arched palate, and dental misalignment. Skin lesions consisted of scattered, white to skin-colored papules, less than 1 centimeter in diameter, and with central protrusion, that were distributed on the dorsum of fingers (Fig 1), forearms (Fig 2), distal portion of the thighs and on the calves (Fig 3). No lesions on the trunk or proximal areas of extremities were detected. Palms, soles, dorsum of feet and mucosal membranes were spared. No sensory changes associated with the lesions. He did not have any history of medication consumption. Family history was negative.

An unusual presentation of anetoderma: a case report

Aghaei S, Sodaifi M, Aslani FS, Mazharinia N - BMC Dermatol. (2004)

Bottom Line: Lesions were detected neither on the trunk nor the proximal areas of extremities.There are no sensory changes associated with the lesions.He did not have any medication consumption history.

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. shahinaghaei@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Anetoderma is a benign condition with focal loss of dermal elastic tissue resulting in localized areas of flaccid or herniated saclike skin. Currently, anetoderma is classified as either primary (idiopathic), or secondary anetoderma (which is associated with a variety of skin conditions, penicillamine use, or neonatal prematurity). Lesions appear on the upper arms, trunk, and thighs.

Case presentation: We report a 14-year-old boy, which was noticed to have had multiple, white, non-pruritic areas on the acral sites of upper and lower extremities for two years. In physical examination, the patient had normal mental development. Skin lesions consisted of scattered, white to skin-colored papules, less than 1 cm in diameter, and with central protrusion, with distribution on dorsal part of the index finger, forearms, distal portion of thighs and calves. Lesions were detected neither on the trunk nor the proximal areas of extremities. There are no sensory changes associated with the lesions. Otherwise, his general health was good. He did not have any medication consumption history. Family history was negative. Laboratory examinations were within normal limits. Skin biopsy from one of his lesions was done, that confirmed the diagnosis of anetoderma.

Conclusions: In summary, we report a case of anetoderma on unusual sites of the skin. We could not find similar reports of anetoderma developing on distal extremities without involvement of the upper trunk and proximal arms, in the medical literature.

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