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Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

Bansal P, Rohatgi S, Agnihotri A, Gupta A - Contemp Clin Dent (2011)

Bottom Line: A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch.These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome.Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

Affiliation: Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Sciences and Research, Faridabad, India.

ABSTRACT

Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

Intraoral swelling in relation to the left permanent lower first molar
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Figure 1: Intraoral swelling in relation to the left permanent lower first molar

Mentions: A 17-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of her intraoral swelling of size approximately 1 cm × 1.5 cm in relation to the mesial aspect of the permanent lower left first molar [Figure 1]. The swelling was first noticed by the patient 2 months back, and it was gradually growing in size since then. The overlying mucosa was normal in color, with a reddish tinge at its base and sides. On further inspection, it seemed to be a hyperplastic, well-defined, vascular and sessile lesion. On palpation, it was non-tender, soft to firm in consistency, extending to both the buccal and the lingual vestibule and non-ulcerated and was posing no difficulty during function. Complete set of teeth were present in either arch along with satisfactory occlusion. The involved tooth was grossly carious. There was no other significant medical history related to this condition except for the fact that the patient was seemingly undernourished and anemic.

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Non-syndromic multiple impacted supernumerary teeth with peripheral giant cell granuloma

Bansal P, Rohatgi S, Agnihotri A, Gupta A - Contemp Clin Dent (2011)

Intraoral swelling in relation to the left permanent lower first molar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Figure 1: Intraoral swelling in relation to the left permanent lower first molar
Mentions: A 17-year-old girl was referred for evaluation of her intraoral swelling of size approximately 1 cm × 1.5 cm in relation to the mesial aspect of the permanent lower left first molar [Figure 1]. The swelling was first noticed by the patient 2 months back, and it was gradually growing in size since then. The overlying mucosa was normal in color, with a reddish tinge at its base and sides. On further inspection, it seemed to be a hyperplastic, well-defined, vascular and sessile lesion. On palpation, it was non-tender, soft to firm in consistency, extending to both the buccal and the lingual vestibule and non-ulcerated and was posing no difficulty during function. Complete set of teeth were present in either arch along with satisfactory occlusion. The involved tooth was grossly carious. There was no other significant medical history related to this condition except for the fact that the patient was seemingly undernourished and anemic.

Bottom Line: A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch.These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome.Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

Affiliation: Sudha Rustagi College of Dental Sciences and Research, Faridabad, India.

ABSTRACT

Peripheral giant cell granuloma (PGCG) is a relatively frequent benign reactive lesion of the gingiva, originating from the periosteum or periodontal membrane following local irritation or chronic trauma. PGCG manifests as a red-purple nodule located in the region of the gingiva or edentulous alveolar margins. The lesion can develop at any age, although it is more common between the second and third decades of life, and shows a slight female predilection. PGCG is a soft tissue lesion that very rarely affects the underlying bone, although the latter may suffer superficial erosion. A supernumerary tooth is one that is additional to the normal series and can be found in almost any region of the dental arch. These teeth may be single, multiple, erupted or unerupted and may or may not be associated with syndrome. Usually, they cause one or the other problem in eruption or alignment of teeth, but may also present without disturbing the normal occlusion or eruption pattern. Management of these teeth depends on the symptoms. Presented here is a case of PGCG in relation to the lower left permanent first molar with three supernumerary teeth in the mandibular arch but no associated syndrome.

View Similar Images In: Results  - Collection
View Article: PubMed Central -  PubMed
Show All Figures - Show MeSH
getmorefigures.php?pmc=3220175&rFormat=json&query=null&req=5