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Effect of alcohol on histopathological changes in STZ induced diabetic rat kidney Photomicrograph of normal control (NC) kidney showing 1. Normal renal parenchyma, 2. Normal tubules, 3. Normal glomeruli. Photomicrograph of alcohol treated (At) kidney showing, 1. Severe Tubular degeneration, 2. Severe congestion of blood vessels, 3. Necrosis of the renal cells, 4. Degeneration of glomeruli. Photomicrograph of diabetic control (DC) kidney showing, 1. Severe tubular degeneration, 2. Focal necrosis of tubules, 3. Degeneration of glomeruli. Photomicrograph of diabetic +alcohol treated (D+At) rat kidney showing 1. Hyaline casts, 2. Dilatation of Bowmen's capsule. 3. Degeneration of tubules
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Figure 2: Effect of alcohol on histopathological changes in STZ induced diabetic rat kidney Photomicrograph of normal control (NC) kidney showing 1. Normal renal parenchyma, 2. Normal tubules, 3. Normal glomeruli. Photomicrograph of alcohol treated (At) kidney showing, 1. Severe Tubular degeneration, 2. Severe congestion of blood vessels, 3. Necrosis of the renal cells, 4. Degeneration of glomeruli. Photomicrograph of diabetic control (DC) kidney showing, 1. Severe tubular degeneration, 2. Focal necrosis of tubules, 3. Degeneration of glomeruli. Photomicrograph of diabetic +alcohol treated (D+At) rat kidney showing 1. Hyaline casts, 2. Dilatation of Bowmen's capsule. 3. Degeneration of tubules

Mentions: In STZ-induced diabetic control rats, severe tubular degeneration, degeneration of glomeruli, focal necrosis of tubules, cystic dilatation of tubules, and fatty infiltration in the kidney tissue were observed. The above pathological changes were enhanced in alcohol-treated diabetic rats and dilatation of Bowman's capsule and hyaline casts were also observed [Figure 2].

Effect of alcohol on blood glucose and antioxidant enzymes in the liver and kidney of diabetic rats

Shanmugam KR, Mallikarjuna K, Reddy KS - Indian J Pharmacol (2011)

Bottom Line: Alcohol consumption is a widespread practice.The antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assayed in the liver and kidney tissues.So the consumption of alcohol by diabetic subjects may be potentially harmful.

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Diabetes mellitus affects every organ in the man including eyes, kidney, heart, and nervous system. Alcohol consumption is a widespread practice. As the effects of chronic alcohol consumption on diabetic state have been little studied, this study was conducted with the objective of evaluating the effect of alcohol in diabetic rats.

Materials and methods: For this study, the rats were divided into five groups (n = 6 in each group): normal control (NC), alcohol treatment (At), diabetic control (DC), diabetic plus alcohol treatment (D + At), diabetic plus glibenclamide treatment (D + Gli). Alcohol treatment was given to the diabetic rats for 30 days. During the period the blood glucose levels, and body weight changes were observed at regular intervals. The antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assayed in the liver and kidney tissues.

Results: The blood glucose levels were significantly (P < 0.001) elevated and body weight significantly (P < 0.001) decreased in alcohol-treated diabetic rats. SOD and CAT activities were decreased and the MDA level increased significantly (P < 0.001) in alcohol-treated diabetic rats. Histopathological studies showed that alcohol damages the liver and kidney tissues in diabetic rats.

Conclusion: These finddings concluded that the consumption of alcohol in diabetic rats worsens the condition. So the consumption of alcohol by diabetic subjects may be potentially harmful.

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