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Brain CT without contrast. Decreasing hypodensity in left occipital and parietal lobes with improvement of hemorrhagic foci and almost complete resolution of right occipital lesions.
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Figure 9: Brain CT without contrast. Decreasing hypodensity in left occipital and parietal lobes with improvement of hemorrhagic foci and almost complete resolution of right occipital lesions.

Mentions: A follow-up CT 17 days later showed decreasing hypodensity in left occipital and parietal lobes with improvement of the hemorrhagic foci and almost complete resolution of the right occipital lesions. (Figure 9)

Atypical imaging findings in a renal transplant patient with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: a case report

Soler Riera C, Haddad L, Scocco D, Fischer G, Saubidet CL, Alvarez PA - Cases J (2009)

Bottom Line: Ischemic stroke was diagnosed and aspirin and permissive hypertension were indicated.Twelve hours later he developed left sided motor seizures and cortical blindness.Magnetic Resonance Image showed hyper intensity in T2 and FLAIR in both occipital lobes and a small area of cortical restricted diffusion in Diffuson Weighted Images in the left occipital lobe.

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas (CEMIC), Av Las Heras 2900 (C1425ASS), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT

Background: Atypical clinical and imaging findings in Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome are recognized with increasing frequency.

Case report: We report a case of an adult in his 5(th )decade immunosupressed with methilprednisolone, tacrolimus and micophenolate who two months after renal transplantation, multiple infections and an episode of humoral rejection became hypertensive with severe headaches, visual field abnormalities, seizures, left hemiparesis and hemineglect. Computed Tomography scan of the brain showed a hypo dense lesion in the left occipital lobe. Ischemic stroke was diagnosed and aspirin and permissive hypertension were indicated. Twelve hours later he developed left sided motor seizures and cortical blindness. Magnetic Resonance Image showed hyper intensity in T2 and FLAIR in both occipital lobes and a small area of cortical restricted diffusion in Diffuson Weighted Images in the left occipital lobe. With a diagnosis of Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome his blood pressure was controlled with intravenous labetalol, and two days later the neurologic findings returned to baseline and most Computed tomography findings resolved.

Conclusion: This case underscores that in the appropriate setting Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome should be suspected and the clinician should not be misled by atypical clinical or imaging findings. In contrast to other pathologies that resemble Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome, with the right and timely treatment, signs, symptoms and images can be completely reversible.

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